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Discussion Starter #1
Disclaimer: This power supply kit is not for bicycle weight weenies. It will add weight to your bike. If you're the type of cyclist who is obsessed with your bike weighing as little as possible and would never dream of adding weight to it and spend a lot of money to remove weight stop reading this blog article now. This is not for you.

However, if you're the type of cyclist who has discovered you need some sort of on bike power supply from time to time, read on. This article will give you an idea on how to build one.

Sometimes when riding his recumbent the blog author recently discovered he needs an on board or on bike power supply to power and help keep his wireless device charged and powered for various uses.

The kit includes:
1. An sealed AGM 12 volt 2.9 amp hour or AH battery.
2. A female DC power connector with insulated female tabs at one end to connect to connect to battery terminal tabs.
3. A male DC power connector with the correct connectors used to attach it to power inverter.
4. Power inverter of your choice.

To build the kit the blog author purchased the male DC power connector and cut off the battery post terminal clamps and crimped the insulated female tab connectors. He then took a male DC power plug and cut off the battery post terminal clamps and crimped the correct connectors to it so it could be attached to the power inverter. Other inverters may vary from the design used in this application. The power inverter with the male DC power connector is also used with a larger deep cycle marine battery as a power source when camping.

When in use the female DC power connector is connected to the battery with the tabs. The male and female ends of the DC power power cable are connected together and the wireless device charger is plugged into the AC outlet on the front of the inverter, the other end connected to the wireless device and the inverter is turned on.

After over 2 hours of continuous use the battery still had a 55% charge. The use included but was not limited to playing music at the same time as using the GPS to map the bike ride the blog author participated in. The wireless device can also be used to take photos, talk and text on, in some cases all at the same time.

The day this was first tested it was very cool to cold out during the ride. It will next be tested on warmer to hot spring and summer days to see how it holds up from inside the seat bag with out overheating.

The kit fits perfectly in the seat bag on the bloggers recumbent bicycle and weighs between 3 and 4 pounds.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Can I buy one!?
I don't sell them. I purchased the components separately and had to modify some of them to make them work. The battery alone was about $25.00, the female DC power connector was $10.00. Don't remember how much the inverter was or the male DC power connector.

Because I modified the DC power connectors, which likely falls outside of the intended use, and voids the warranty, I am not willing to risk selling these kits to anyone else, thus avoiding any liability. By volunteering the information, not selling it, there is no liability on my part as those who read the information can do with it what they freely choose to.

The kit I built is what works for me and my application. I give no guarantees it will work for anyone else, especially if they use it to power something other than a wireless device as I am using it for.

I will say this, what anyone else chooses to use it to provide power for, pay attention to the required amps. If it exceeds the amp hours or AH rating on the battery, especially an sealed AGM battery it may not work very well and can cause the battery to fail to where it will not longer hold a charge and can cause damage to the device you're trying to power.

I had a 1.4 AH battery that I tried to use for a different application. the battery will no longer hold a charge and what I was trying to power with it was almost damaged. Thankfully the battery gave out before it was.

One more thing about direct current, or DC power, the amp rating on the device us typically the maximum amps the device will ever operate at. Most devices only need such amperage from the power supply for things like power up. Once a device is running, depending on what it is, it runs on a lower amperage. Through personal experience as long as a battery meets or exceeds the max. required amperage for the device it will work fine.
 
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