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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1. Install the fenders and wear the goggles. For your own good, fenders are indispensable. Be aware that rain and mud can fly down the wheels, onto your face, on your body, and even blur your vision. If you wear goggles, you can also prevent rain, mud and other things from flying into your eyes.



2. Be careful of slipping and pay attention to turning. The ground is easy to slip on rainy days. When riding, you should pay attention to changing the tires in a timely manner. It is best to choose tires with drainage patterns. Also, try to avoid those zebra crossings and road traffic signs. Be more careful when turning, and reducing speed is the primary requirement. When entering a corner, it is best to turn a straight line to enter.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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5,882 Posts
^^Something odd about the OP language.

I agree with the use of fenders. Also eye protection of some sort, though I'd advocate for that on any and all rides. Bugs are everywhere. Just last night, I had to wear sun glasses after dark because the bugs were about thick enough to be harnessed and used for flight.

It's also well to get used to looking through water spots and bits of mud. Glasses/goggles tend to get messy quickly in inclement weather. There is an art to looking through that junk and seeing well enough to pick a safe line. I've found my helmet's visor can help shield the glasses, though they still get pretty cruddy after a few miles.

It's also true that wet pavement has a lower coefficient of friction than does dry pavement, but the real threat is the lines painted over the pavement. Also any streets paved with bricks (they do still exist). Either surface offers dramatically less traction wet than it does dry.

I have worked my way up confidence in making leaning turns on wet pavement. One large factor is knowing to either shape my turn to avoid any painted lines or slow way down before hitting the paint.

On the tire front, I'd understood that bicycles don't go fast enough to risk hydroplaning on water the way cars can. On pavement, slicks are just as safe and effective as tires with tread. For bicycles. In theory ;). My touring bike rolls on very mild tread while the recumbent uses slicks.

Much like riding in the snow, riding in the rain is more challenging than doing so on a sunny day, but can be more rewarding too. A little rain or snow changes the whole character and look of a given landscape. Even familiar sights become new again. I love the hiss of tires over wet pavement and splashing through the occasional puddle.

There are few treats better than rolling through a forest on a damp, misty day with rain creating a whole new soundscape of drops on leaves and undergrowth.
 

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Old, fat, and slow
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I understand the physics and all that, but I was riding in a rainstorm a couple years back when a gust of wind slid my bike a few feet to the left, right over the road's center line. Not traffic, thankfully, but if I wasn't hydroplaning I was levitating. The bike didn't lean, the bars didn't shift, the front wheel didn't turn, the whole thing just slide to the center of the road.

People can explain again and again that some stuff is impossible, but I tend to trust my senses.
 

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Maturity Challenged
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...Wet leaves and mud that gets washed over the path.
 
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