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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Lets get this going. IMO the first tool purchase should be a good floor pump.
 

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Lets get this going. IMO the first tool purchase should be a good floor pump.
Yes! Lets start arguing! I never use my floor pump, since the gauge broke. A frame pump is a much better tool to own and one like the Topeak Road Morph G that is also a floor pump, will get you up to 120psi anytime, anywhere.

Haha, this thread is about the existence of a bike maintenance forum. The arguments, heated debates and good information on the topics of bike maintenance should probably be in separate threads about each topic, so each gets the attention it deserves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes! Lets start arguing! I never use my floor pump, since the gauge broke. A frame pump is a much better tool to own and one like the Topeak Road Morph G that is also a floor pump, will get you up to 120psi anytime, anywhere.

Haha, this thread is about the existence of a bike maintenance forum. The arguments, heated debates and good information on the topics of bike maintenance should probably be in separate threads about each topic, so each gets the attention it deserves.
I give the frame pump the edge in multi use. I like the floor pump for use as a shop tool. I have the Topeak Joe Blow II. The gage is accurate enough. I have compared it to my Schwinn Cyclone that I have had for years. They are within 5 PSI of each other. The check valve on the cyclone began to leak after 10 years so I got the Topeak.

I presently dont own a frame pump. I have stated elsewhere around here that I will be going over to one once I run out of C02. How is your pump monted onto your frame?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
With or without an integrated pressure gauge? Are they accurate?
The gauge really only needs to be repeatable. Once you find your sweet spot 100 or 110 whatever it may be on your gauge it does'nt matter if its off + or - a few pounds. It is only a value read on a gauge.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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Lets get this going. IMO the first tool purchase should be a good floor pump.
I have an old frame pump that works for my inflation needs if the power is out. Otherwise I use my floor compressor with a stand-alone gauge. While the compressor is more expensive, it works for more than just bike tires. I can also change the tip and use effectively unlimited compressed air to blow debris and crud out of the places it accumulates.

I might recommend noobs start with a frame or other carry-with-you pump and the obligatory patch kit + tire levers. I ultimately view these as a single tool since none of the single pieces are of much benefit in the absence of the other pieces.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Compressors are fine and they wont pop your tires as folk lore would have it.
 

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Seasider
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Yes! Lets start arguing! I never use my floor pump, since the gauge broke. A frame pump is a much better tool to own and one like the Topeak Road Morph G that is also a floor pump, will get you up to 120psi anytime, anywhere.

Haha, this thread is about the existence of a bike maintenance forum. The arguments, heated debates and good information on the topics of bike maintenance should probably be in separate threads about each topic, so each gets the attention it deserves.
I like this guy already, He is contentious and has an english pomposity about him!:)

I like floor pumps and after years of hand pumping (oooer missus) it was the best thing I ever bought for the bike. Even if the gauge is not that accurate it will be close enough for my needs

from The tattoed sexist limey pig
 

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Having a floor pump at home and a smaller hand held pump mounted to my bikes for road side or trail punctures has worked well for me over the years. Never used CO2.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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Compressors are fine and they wont pop your tires as folk lore would have it.
Though I'm very aware of the possibility, I've never had any issues with compressors popping any tubes. I'm also running the skinniest tires I ever have at 700x42. Prior, I rolled even fatter MTB stuff.

I just use several small shots of air with pressure tests in-between instead of the big, long pulls you'd use to fill a car tire. NEVER add pressure blind. I don't know for sure, but it makes sense that you'd be more likely to pop a tube in the 700x25 or x28 range - with far less internal volume, such tubes seem like they'd be easier to over-inflate.
 

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With regards to compressors and over inflating/popping tyres:
In my experience the reason people most commonly blow tubes using a compressor is through filling the air all in one go. As mentioned by newleaf150, small amounts of air and checking as you go is the safest method when using a compressor, what you are checking for is where the tyre beads to the rim, if there is an uneven seat between the tyre and rim then the tyre can be pushed off the rim. Look for an even seat/beading of the tyre as you inflate. In fact you should do this with a floor pump also :)
 

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Eocyclist
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On my wife's bike there is a Topeak Road Morph pump. On my bike there is a Topeak Turbo Morph pump. Both have accurate pressure gauges, and both have gotten us running again after encountering sharps on the road.

But currently gracing our dining room, right next to the dining room table, is the Piece de Resistance of bicycle tire pumps ... a Lezyne Alloy Floor Pump. :love:

It has great features for the business of pumping tires. There is a reversable chuck for Presta or Schrader valves that screws on the valve stem. With this pump, there will never be another damaged valve stem. It pumps fairly easily thanks to the small diameter bore, and it can reach to 220 psi.

But it is not only a highly functional pump, it is a beautiful piece of design work, with a high polish aluminum barrel, a varnished wood handle, a stable three leg base, and a large pressure gauge. It will make any engineer's heart skip a beat.

I saw a Lezyne for the first time earlier this year. My wife and I were on tour and stopped at a bike shop to replace a piece of broken gear. My wife had had a flat the day before, and we asked the shop owner if he had something we could use to check tire pressure.

He handed me the Lezyne. I took it in both hands and stared at it a while before starting to pump up the tube. What a beautiful machine. From the first moment I saw it, I knew I had to have one.

I bought one the day after we got home. I keep it in the dining room because I think it compliments the hardwood floors and table. My wife hasn't complained ... yet.

So ... bottom line ... not all equipment decisions are based strictly on function. Form plays an important part as well.
 

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I do like floor pumps and I would have never considered relying solely on a frame pump before I got the Topeak Road Morph which is sort of a hybrid, a portable floor pump in a way. Still it does take a lot of strokes compared to a real floor pump, and I'm tempted to buy that Lezyne! Looks nice. Lezyne also makes very nice frame pumps with the 'portable floor pump' type design.

My floor pump is a Topeak model with a digital gauge. I thought the digital gauge was really cool, and it was, but after years of service the gauge quit and when I changed the batteries it didn't come back on. :( So I'm using the little Topeak for now because it has a gauge.
 

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Seasider
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Thanks guys, the Lezyne pumps look great. I also fancy one that converts to a mini floor pump
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I do like floor pumps and I would have never considered relying solely on a frame pump before I got the Topeak Road Morph which is sort of a hybrid, a portable floor pump in a way. Still it does take a lot of strokes compared to a real floor pump, and I'm tempted to buy that Lezyne! Looks nice. Lezyne also makes very nice frame pumps with the 'portable floor pump' type design.

My floor pump is a Topeak model with a digital gauge. I thought the digital gauge was really cool, and it was, but after years of service the gauge quit and when I changed the batteries it didn't come back on. :( So I'm using the little Topeak for now because it has a gauge.
Send an email to Todson. I believe they are the parent company for topeak. They can sell you replacement parts. If the pump is still under warranty they will honor it. They have replaced the chuck on my pump FOC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Me too my wife is the same If I ever leave a pump on the floor in the dining room I am sure she wont say a single word as the pump is on it's way to my head.:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Larry you may have just sold more pumps with that post than Amazon has in the last year.
 

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Eocyclist
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My floor pump is a Topeak model with a digital gauge. I thought the digital gauge was really cool, and it was, but after years of service the gauge quit and when I changed the batteries it didn't come back on. :( So I'm using the little Topeak for now because it has a gauge.
I hate that when a favorite piece of gear quits on you. Like davereo said, Todson is a pretty good company. They should be able to replace what's broken, tho they may charge something for it.
 
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