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I am in need of a new rear 26" mountain bike wheel. The 1st ride after having my rear wheel trued, bent it in the exact same way.

I'd rather not spend a lot of money, but I don't want to deal with a rim that won't stay true. Can anyone recommend a good wheel?

Thanks for the help :)
 

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Hi I dont know how much you are looking to spend. I have some Spinergy Xyclones and they are great, light wheels. No problems but I weight 125. They are also expensive. I have a set of Vuelta superlite comps. They are about $120 and I havent had any problems with those either. They are a little heavier though.
 

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Yeah, the Deore/Rhyno Lite wheels are dependable. Just don't like Shimano products, personally.

Sun/Ringle' Equalizers are under $200, and the best wheels I've ever run.
 

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Build your own. I got Mavic 317 rims for $19.00 a pair, novatech hubs for $30, and spokes with nipples for 460.00. First time building wheels but they turned out great.
 

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I have Bontraegers on my race bike, and Mavics on my training bike and play bike. Bontraegers are lite, but no where near as reliable as the Mavics
 

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Build your own. I got Mavic 317 rims for $19.00 a pair, novatech hubs for $30, and spokes with nipples for 460.00. First time building wheels but they turned out great.

Great deal on the rims, but I think spokes can be had for less. Built wheels are often cheaper than the cost of the components if purchased separately.
 

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Great deal on the rims, but I think spokes can be had for less. Built wheels are often cheaper than the cost of the components if purchased separately.
Here's the catch, though- when built by the right hands, custom wheels will last so much longer. And you can find decent parts pretty inexpensively.

Repair trick: If you true the wheels yourself, add more tension to the spokes (tighten them further all around). That strengthens the wheel. If you take it to the shop, ask them about how to keep the wheel from folding on you and then have them do it.
 

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Here's the catch, though- when built by the right hands, custom wheels will last so much longer. And you can find decent parts pretty inexpensively.

Repair trick: If you true the wheels yourself, add more tension to the spokes (tighten them further all around). That strengthens the wheel. If you take it to the shop, ask them about how to keep the wheel from folding on you and then have them do it.
I'm thinking his spoke price had an extra "0" as a typo. Probably only $46 on the spokes (we hope).

Most wheels out of the box are under tensioned, which can lead to a rim failing prematurely. However, it is possible to make spokes too tight and have the same problem.

Buy your wheel from an actual bike shop who will give you some sort of guarantee or service warranty with it.

No matter what wheel you buy, whether for $20 or $1000, it's possible to kill it at any time if you smash it just right.
 

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Welcome to Two Spoke, Rex!

Here's the catch, though- when built by the right hands, custom wheels will last so much longer. And you can find decent parts pretty inexpensively.
With a few notable exceptions, I've had pretty good luck with wheels that I assume were machine built. They usually last until the rim wears out. When I replace the rim, I then have a wheel built by the right hands, mine! :)

ibisman got a great deal on his rims, but his cost was still higher than the $95 price of the built wheelset I suggested. If I recall correctly, I bought one Mavic A317 rim for twice what he paid for a pair of 317s. (Same rims?) I see XM317 for $25/pr at Amazon right now... (?)

Building your own wheel will not save you money unless you get very good deals on the components vs. a very bad deal on the built wheels.

I'm currently using wheels from Jensen USA similar to those I recommended except mine have Deore XT hubs instead of Deore. The wheels were built well and true and the spokes are well tensioned, but they are not DT, they are polished HTI spokes.






The spokes on these wheels are not as highly regarded as the hubs and rims, so buyer beware. I've only had the wheels one month, but they appear to be holding up well to the heavy use they've been put to.

Repair trick: If you true the wheels yourself, add more tension to the spokes (tighten them further all around). That strengthens the wheel. If you take it to the shop, ask them about how to keep the wheel from folding on you and then have them do it.
I use a similar approach, but I fear I may have over tensioned in the past.


I'm more careful about over tightening now.
 

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Welcome to Two Spoke, DGM!

I'm thinking his spoke price had an extra "0" as a typo. Probably only $46 on the spokes (we hope)...

No matter what wheel you buy, whether for $20 or $1000, it's possible to kill it at any time if you smash it just right.
Yep, bicycle wheels are not resistant to lateral forces.

You probably don't have to "smash it just right" to kill the $20 wheel. :D
 

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I use a similar approach, but I fear I may have over tensioned in the past. I'm more careful about over tightening now.

What rims were those/ how did you manage that? Ouch. I've never had a problem with over tensioning, but then again I'm probably not strong enough to actually overtighten...
 

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.... but then again I'm probably not strong enough to actually overtighten...
You would be suprised! When wheels are still fairly new and nothing has seized in place yet, it's pretty easy to over tighten the nipples.

The best way to know is to use a tensiometer, which will actually measure how taught a spoke is. Pro wheel builders can do it by feel after plenty of experience, but tend to still check with a gauge on occasion.
 
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