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I was wondering how fast can you usually go on a recumbent compared to a regular bike? It seems like they might be slower.
 

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speed of recumbents

Yea, recumbents might be slower, because I enjoy riding mine so much, I purposely take a lower speed to lay back and enjoy the scenery, fresh air, and smooth ride! Those of you siting on a small saddle are in constant pain, bent over the handle bars trying to go as fast as you can to get the ride over with, so you can get home and smear on some more Preparation H!:D:D REally, there is less wind resistance on a recumbent style bike (they hold the land speed record, I believe) and you can really muscle those pedals if you want to, compared to just lifting your own weight on a conventional diamond frame bike, so I can usually pull away from another biker if I want to crank them! Recumbents may be harder to balance, but the ride can't be beat!
 

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Slowin it up.
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I believe that. Recumbent s are the only exercise I've seen taken in a Hammock position. Hammocks are awesome. I looking into all kinds of rigs now so I have to ask what got you into recumbents Peadalpusher.
 

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Bents have the reputation of being fastest and different; begging conversation. The fine print is they weigh more and, riders being equal, are slower in hills. There is an anti-social aspect relative to diamond frames, slower up hills, faster down, no one wants to draft in a peleton of diamond frames. Bents with windscreen and shroud are warmer in teh winter but more subject to side wind. I don't find any difference in being noticed in traffic.
 

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pleasure!

funetical: I LIKE THE RELAXED RIDE OF A RECUMBENT, WITH 27 SPEEDS I pick an easy spinning speed and enjoy the ride more than on a conventional bike. I picked the recumbent style because the bike is my only form of transportation for nearly two years now, so it needs to be something one can look forward to using on a daily basis!
 

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If I could find a cheap one I'd be chillaxing with you. I like the look. I had to pass a guy on a recumbant a few days ago, when I looked at his face, 90% joy 5% curiosity 5% terror. I'd say. I'm not a scientist.
 

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When I finish a long ride on my Goldrush, I put my feet down and stay seated; I get off my diamond frame.

BTW, I rode my bent to work because windscreen and shroud are warmer, I can jam all kinds of carry ons and the long wheel base bent is far less likely to be stolen). I rode my Single speed diamond frame to a meeting in town because lights and fenders are already installed, better night handling in town.
 

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In my case I have one semi enclosed recumbent and several diamond "traditional" frame bikes including a mountain bike (off road), a standard racing/touring bike and a single speed/fixed with 35c tires, fenders and lights (great for noodling around and winter slush, salt and sand). Seem reasonable?
 

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Heart of Texas Rally

Here is an opportunity to learn about recumbents first hand. Easy Street Recumbents in Austin, Texas will be hosting their annual Bent Event on April 18th, 2010. It will be preceded by the Heart of Texas Catrike Rally April 16th-18th. Group rides, test rides and the chance to see many different kinds of recumbent bikes and trikes.
 

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bents

Seven years ago I bought an Italian low-rider and spent the summer giving it a try. Took me about 2 months to get my riding muscles used to the different postion. (You should expect this.) For the next few months I rode in several time trials and all over Northeast Massachusetts. Here are my findings:

A.) They are not faster than diamond frame bikes of similar quality. In the hills they are much slower.

B.) They are very comfortable for a while. Then you start to get antsy in the seat and have no option but to stop. No standing, no flexability in position. This was my finding, I would not argue with a guy who likes his bent. We are all different.

C.) They are not nearly as nimble and able in traffic. You can't jump off the mark, and I always felt like the turtle and not the hare when traffic got gnarly. You can't jump up on sidewalks in an emergency. At least I couldn't.

D.) They climb hills like lead balloons and do not feel as stable in down hill decent over 40 mph. Give me a good DF anytime at speed.

You are now free to kill me.
 

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You are now free to kill me.
No need to kill anyone. :) Your opinions are valid, based upon your personal experiences. Many bents fit your description but there are others that do not. The example set by Team Rans in RAAM (Race Across America) 2009 would contradict the assertion that all recumbents are slow and that they cannot climb. 3021 miles with an average of 20.46 mph, they were first in their team division (4-man recumbent) but they also came in ahead of all the other 4-man teams on DF road bikes. Maria Parker's recent record setting ride in Saratoga would be another example of the speed and climbing ability of specific recumbents. Your experience would indicate that either your recumbent was not designed for this kind of performance OR that it simply wasn't compatible with your riding style. One person's dream ride is another person's nightmare. You just have to find the right bike for the right task.
 

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No need to kill anyone. :) Your opinions are valid, based upon your personal experiences. Many bents fit your description but there are others that do not. The example set by Team Rans in RAAM (Race Across America) 2009 would contradict the assertion that all recumbents are slow and that they cannot climb. 3021 miles with an average of 20.46 mph, they were first in their team division (4-man recumbent) but they also came in ahead of all the other 4-man teams on DF road bikes. Maria Parker's recent record setting ride in Saratoga would be another example of the speed and climbing ability of specific recumbents. Your experience would indicate that either your recumbent was not designed for this kind of performance OR that it simply wasn't compatible with your riding style. One person's dream ride is another person's nightmare. You just have to find the right bike for the right task.
That cross country race is a good indicator of speed. Can't argue that. In my experience it felt like I could never get the full push of my legs on the pedals from the layed out position. No doubt the lower aero position is good. I just did not feel powerful laying down. Don't get me wrong, I like any HPV and support all efforts. Trikes under fairing look very interesting.

One time trial note: I have a 10 mile loop I do, and have done, for more than 35 years near my home. I'm currently 52 and in good shape. I pedal year round, right through the winter on studs. Never been really out of shape in my life. My best speeds now at 10 miles on a Kona TT bike are just over 27.5 mph. As a younger man I could bump 30 with disc rear and blade spoke front. This on an aero "superman" bike. Best I ever did on a bent was 26.3 mph and that was 7 years ago. I haven't gotten better with age. On a standard road bike today (not aero) I average about 26.2 mph for 10 miles. These are not world class times but they indicate a certain level of fitness. I could never use that fitness to make the recumbent go. It was very eye-opening and frustrating as I expected great things.
 

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Were you right side up? Forwards or backwards?:rolleyes:

I've a similar experience in terms of comparing times except my bent is a long wheel base w windscreen and cloth cover and the engine has 6 years more "refinement" time. It is THE most stable on high speed decents. My loop is a hilly 37 miles. My best time is a fairly upright diamond frame 1:52, next is recumbent 2 hrs and slowest is my fixed gear 2:05. Most of my diamond frame training rides are 2:05 to 2:08. My mountain bike declines.
 

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My wife and I both ride Sun EZ-3 USX trikes. We like them enough to take them with us in our 5th wheel when we go to Arizona for the winter. She has had a hip replaced and major back surgery and she maintains a steady 6 to 8 mph and I maintain a steady 12 to 15 mph on flat ground. Down hill I have had it at 33mph with out any problems.
Here my trike at home and in Arizona.
 

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Cool tris. Say, as a fellow long wheel base recumbent owner, do you think the plastic tube-chain guide is as friction free as a free wheel? I see Easyracer uses short tubes on some assemblies but still uses free wheels on others.
 

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Were you right side up? Forwards or backwards?:rolleyes:

I've a similar experience in terms of comparing times except my bent is a long wheel base w windscreen and cloth cover and the engine has 6 years more "refinement" time. It is THE most stable on high speed decents. My loop is a hilly 37 miles. My best time is a fairly upright diamond frame 1:52, next is recumbent 2 hrs and slowest is my fixed gear 2:05. Most of my diamond frame training rides are 2:05 to 2:08. My mountain bike declines.
Oneway, I suspect your fairing had a tendency to push you downward, especially the front wheel at high speed. As with a race car this would stabilize the vehicle and give the steering better bite. My bike (bent) was unfaired and felt like it wanted to lift off at speeds over 30-35 mph. It lost steering at 40 and was a real terror.

A faired trike is what I'd like to play with next. Not for speed, but fun. They look very comfy for winter riding up where I live. No cold wind in your crotch.....and other places. It's my crotch I worry about most. You can freeze that thing and not be aware.
 

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A faired bent is a warm bent.
Mine is much warmer in the winter but I do worry about the front wheel slipping on icy roads. Good news is you don't have far to fall so injury is not nearly as likely.
 

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A faired bent is a warm bent.
Mine is much warmer in the winter but I do worry about the front wheel slipping on icy roads. Good news is you don't have far to fall so injury is not nearly as likely.
Have you ever used studded tires? I use them on a MTB during the winter and they are great. I lose about 1.5 mph overall. Not bad considering you have to work at slipping with them on. If you try studs get carbide not steel. The carbides wear like iron. (hey, that saying doesn't make sense)
 
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