Two Spoke Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Member
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, love all the information I can get here. I've been riding on and off for nearly 50 years now. I'm currently on a Trek 4500 mtb that i put road tires on and ride 15 - 20 miles a day. I also have my old (25 years old easy) KHS Express that feels like a brick when I ride it. I'm looking at a new road bike but want to be sure it will meet my needs and wants. I want to start doing more miles and possibly do a 100 mile ride by end of summer. I guess I'm looking for a bike that will be easy to ride and go faster than my Trek. Will there be a big difference between what I ride now and a brand new road bike? I'm 6'6" and am thinking I will need a 64cm bike. Does that sound right? I haven't been fitted yet but just talked with a LBS. Right now I'm looking at a Specialized Secteur Comp Apex, Trek 1.5 and a Trek 2.3. Only because these are available in 64cm. I just want to be sure the expense of a new bike will be worth it. Thanks for your help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,973 Posts
Before even getting to the bottom of your post I was thinking Spec Roubaix and I think I'm correct that the Secteur is just the Roubaix in an aluminum frame. I love my 'Roub'. The relaxed geometry makes this 40+ year old body very happy. We have some Trek riders here as too, maybe they will chime in as well. Either way, you're headed down the right path IMHO.

When I started back riding a couple years ago, I dusted off my old mountain bike and put road friendly tires on it. Quickly upgraded to a flat-bar road bike hybrid and them ultimately to the Roubaix. I resisted buying a road bike but in retrospect, I would have saved myself a chunk of money had I just went with the road bike up front.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,352 Posts
When I started back riding a couple years ago, I dusted off my old mountain bike and put road friendly tires on it. Quickly upgraded to a flat-bar road bike hybrid and them ultimately to the Roubaix. I resisted buying a road bike but in retrospect, I would have saved myself a chunk of money had I just went with the road bike up front.[/QUOTE]

The evolution of the road cyclist. This chain of events has been repeated thousands of times. Myself included.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,948 Posts
davereo said:
The evolution of the road cyclist. This chain of events has been repeated thousands of times. Myself included.
Yep! Comfort bike to hybrid to aluminum road bike to carbon road bike in 2 1/2 years.

To OP,

The only person that can answer your questions is you. I would suggest that if you have never ridden a road bike that you test ride them to see if you are going to be comfortable riding one. As far as which one to buy, I would suggest that it's the one that fits you the best and gives you the biggest wow factor. If you go to the websites of all the manufactures, look at all the different bikes that are in your price range and you will notice that, other than brakes, handlebars and saddles, most of them will have the same components. Geometries may vary and that is where the fit comes in. Ride as many different makes and models that you can, and then decide. When you test ride, see how far or how long they will let you test the bike. Just riding in the parking lot will not give you a sense of how the bike feels and handles. Any quality bike will give you years and miles of great riding satisfaction, so getting the right one from the get-go will make your riding experience that much better.
 

·
Member
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the replies. I know what you're saying about the comfort question can only be answered by me. The evolution of the road cyclist makes a lot of sense to me because it seems as that's where I'm headed. Thanks again guys.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,948 Posts
HipsterDufus said:
Thanks for the replies. I know what you're saying about the comfort question can only be answered by me. The evolution of the road cyclist makes a lot of sense to me because it seems as that's where I'm headed. Thanks again guys.
If you find a road bike that fits and is comfortable to you, then the rides will become longer. Saddle time is where you will make up the speed difference. You may notice a mile or two mph difference when you first start riding, but the real difference comes with riding. Since a road bike will be lighter than your current bike and the position is a bit more aero, that is where the initial difference comes to play. As you ride more and lose weight, that will also help increase your speed. The lighter the bike, the faster you can expect to go, but you will pay a price for that luxury.

My fist road bike, the Defy 2, is aluminum and an entry level bike. I didn't want to spend a lot of money on it in the event that I would have problems adapting to the lower riding position or my interest in cycling would drop. Once both of those issues were satisfied, I got a real nice road bike that would last me for many years to come. Enjoy whatever bike you decide to get and ride the hell out of it.
 

·
Yesterday tired old man, Today retired old man
Joined
·
4,311 Posts
I wanted nothing to do with road bars, that was a big mistake as I realy think thay are as good as it gets for me.:)
 

·
Member
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Here's an update. I put some work into my 25 year old KHS road bike and started riding it every day. I actually liked riding that better than my Trek mountain bike. It has the kind of ride I was looking for. I got a decent trade in on my Trek and ordered a Specialized Secteur Comp because I want a modern road bike. A week to ten days from now I'll let you know how I like it.

John: Best advice ever: "ride the hell out of it"
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top