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Discussion Starter #1
It's time to replace my stock tires on my Trek 2.3. Any suggestions on which ones to purchase or consider? I'm on 700 x 23's now and will replace with same size.

Thanks
 

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GiddyUp
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Not a bad recommendation from Xela, but I think you should try out the Vittoria Open Corsa EVO CX in 25mm. I'll be you the first ride you'll be blown away.
 

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Weav, you're absolutely right about the ride quality. My only complaint when I ran those was I would only get about 1200 to 1500 miles out of a set. What kind of mileage did you see?
 

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GiddyUp
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I tend to not be too hard on tires so I get a little more than that but you are correct that they have a reputation of not lasting as long as some do. But the ride quality is the trade-off. I've since switched to tubeless like you. If money isn't that big an issue I say get the Vittoria's, but if money is tight then go with the Conti 4000S, don't know if they have a 25mm version or not, but the 23mm version is a nice tire and since that is what the OP said he wants that may be the way to go. Unless I can talk him into a 25mm.
 

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greenhorn
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Continental Grand Prix 4000s....
Are these a tube tire? I saw them on a website and they called them clinchers, wasn't sure if that was a tube or tubeless.
Saw them for $63, but still looking for a better deal.
 

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GiddyUp
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Yes they are a tube tire. Anytime you see the words "clincher" they are speaking of tubes. The two other types of tires/wheels are called "tubular" and "tubeless". Tubular tires need to be glued onto the rim of a tubular wheel. Tubeless is the same type of tire as your car tires. They seat themselves onto the rim when inflated without the need for a tube. They allow you to run lower tire pressures for more comfort and less rolling resistance, because you don't have to worry about pinch flats like you do with clinchers.
 

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Yesterday tired old man, Today retired old man
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They allow you to run lower tire pressures for more comfort and less rolling resistance,
I can see lower tire pressure giving you a more comfortable ride , but I would think more pressure would give you less rolling resistance. as the tire does not flaten out as much with more pressure. less contact aera less resistance ???
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the suggestions, I now have a direction to look toward. I knew could get the help I needed here, thanks again.
 

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Two skinny J's
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greenhorn
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I am ready to get new road tires for my Giant Defy.
I ride a lot of different roads, not all are smooth surfaces with some gravel berms in the mix. II have heard good things about the Cont. GP4000s. In some of what I read the 25c is a better ride, with lower resistance than the 23c...but the GP4000s is only offered in the 23c. The Gp4000 is available in 23c or 25c.
Do you have any thoughts on the differences before I make my purchase?
 

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U=IMHO, all boils down to the contact patch vs. the type of terrain one will be riding on. Naturally the bigger the contact patch the more stable/softer.
 

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IMHO, all boils down to the contact patch vs. the type of terrain one will be riding on. Naturally the bigger the contact patch the more stable/controllable/softer.
 

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GiddyUp
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If you are a bigger rider I would definitely recommend a 25mm over a 23mm tire for added support and comfort. I like the wider contact patch, I think the comfort will be more noticeable than the rolling resistance.
 

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greenhorn
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Maybe I should have mentioned...I am 5'7", 145 lbs. I wasn't so concerned about the weight on the tire. Just wondering if there is a big difference between the GP 4000 and the 4000s. I do some road racing, but the majority of my rides are commutes and pleasure riding. Most distances are 50 miles per day tops.
In case that helps.
I would love to get a reliable tire, with low resistance that would last a while.
 

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GiddyUp
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I heard somewhere that if you stick with the black GP4000 that it is the same tire as the GP4000S with the black chili compound. I'd still go with the 25mm.
 

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I tend to not be too hard on tires so I get a little more than that but you are correct that they have a reputation of not lasting as long as some do. But the ride quality is the trade-off. I've since switched to tubeless like you. If money isn't that big an issue I say get the Vittoria's, but if money is tight then go with the Conti 4000S, don't know if they have a 25mm version or not, but the 23mm version is a nice tire and since that is what the OP said he wants that may be the way to go. Unless I can talk him into a 25mm.
New to this thread, and while I looked at the article you linked to, I confess to not completely understanding it. Can you (or someone else) explain why the slightly wider tire is a better riding tire?

I can see advantages with a wider tire assisting in cornering and stability, but I have always assumed that rolling resistance had to do with friction, and it would seem that a thinner tire would make less contact with the ground and have less friction.

My purpose for road riding would be more for endurance purposes and speed wouldn't be my prime objective, so I might consider wider for comfort purposes, but in layman's terms I'm not sure I understand the argument about rolling resistance.
 

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spin... spin.. spin
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a lot of riders i know ride on 25's and love them. i am pretty small so i just go with the 23's, i understand the article to be saying that a compressed 23 has more actual surface of itself on the road vs. a 25 sitting up on its center. if you are small like i am i do not believe this is an issue. plus the 23 in my opinion should be faster or i would thank the top tour guys would be riding 25mm tires. they have coaches test teams and managers and stay on the 23mm tires thus there has to be some advantage to them.
my commuter bike has wider tires but my road bike sits on 23mm rubber.
with tires get what is suited for where you ride, since my cf road bike stays on smooth surfaces thinner is perfect. since my commuter hits more pot holes, speed bumps and some gravel i opt for a wider tire.
as far as rolling resistance between a 23mm and 25mm tire most of us would never feel the difference but would slightly feel the nicer ride.
 
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