Road vs Mountain Pedals

Discussion in 'Beginners Forum' started by ratfink, Jun 16, 2009.

  1. ratfink

    ratfink Guest

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    What are the advantages to "road" pedals such as the looks and stuff over "mountain bike pedals" like eggbeaters? It seems that with the eggbeaters being so light they would be the best choice for road. Do they not keep you in as well or what?
     
  2. Doc

    Doc Guest

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    While I dont know the exact reasons I do know that a lot of people in the mountain bike world prefer road clip ins to mountain, dont ask me why.
     

  3. hophead

    hophead New Member Tavern Member

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    Road pedals in conjunction with road shoes are supposed to give you a much stiffer platform for pedaling than mtn pedals and shoes. Small pedals like Eggbeaters can become very uncomfortable on long rides with flexy shoes. Personally, I prefer mtn shoes and pedals on my road bikes. I run Eggbeaters on all of my xc and road bikes with very stiff carbon fiber soled mtn shoes. The biggest advantage of this set up is that you can actually walk in mtn shoes. Also, I only need one pair of shoes with one type of cleat and all of my pedals are interchangeable.

    If you do frequent really long road rides like centuries and such, I'm sure that there is some advantage to riding road specific pedals.
     
  4. mothra

    mothra Guest

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    How easy is it to snap and unsnap the shoe from the pedals? On trails and stuff I would be putting down one foot to keep from falling over alot...
     
  5. hophead

    hophead New Member Tavern Member

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    I can only comment on mtn bike pedals since that's all that I have ever used, but from what I understand, road pedals work in much the same way. Anyway, there is a learning curve to using clipless pedals and it can be painful. At first, you will have to be conscious that your feet are attached to the bike and you need to rotate your heels outward to unclip. Uncliping also occurs automatically most times when you crash. There was one time last summer when I crashed in a rock garden and landed on my back still clipped in with my bike sticking straight up in the air. I wish that I had that one on video. It would have been hilarious. That was an OTB crash, so my feet did not rotate outward which is rare.

    The act of uncliping is actually very easy. After some time and maybe a few falls, you will automatically unclip when necessary without thinking. Like balancing and breathing your body will just do it.
     
  6. hellrider

    hellrider Guest

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    what is an eggbeater pedal?
     
  7. hophead

    hophead New Member Tavern Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  8. camilo

    camilo New Member

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    Other reasons have been given on possible advantages of road pedals vs. eggbeaters or other mtb pedals. I won't repeat them except to say, until this year I used single sided and two sided SPD pedals and cheap-ish MTB shoes on my road bikes for years. This year I changed to good quality shoes and Time RXS road pedals. Other than the shoes being much more comfortable and light weight, I can't say there's a night and day difference. I could have achieved the comfort thing by just buying MTB shoes, so that's not a reason in itself. Maybe some difference in performance, but if anyone needs the better walkability of MTB shoes, there's no strong reason not to use them, assuming good quality and fit.

    But, specifically in regard to Eggbeaters. It's a common mistake to think that just because eggbeaters are so spartan looking that they're ultra light. At about 270-280 grams per sset, the regular old (non-Ti) egg beaters aren't really lighter than many similarly priced road pedals such as Look (classic and sprint), Time RXS and even the higher end Shimano offerings.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2009
  9. Xela

    Xela New Member Tavern Member

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    I also feel that road specific pedals give a more secure connection between the shoe and pedal, especially the better ones that pro-level teams use. The last thing a pro cyclist with tons of wattage wants is his foot to come out of the pedal when putting the power down for a sprint.

    That being said, it also means that the road pedals are a little harder to disengage, but on the road, there's not nearly as many emergency situations when you need to unclip quickly. But keep this in mind when your rolling up to a traffic light or stop-sign, so you're not the object of laughter from fellow cyclists and motorists as you slowly fall over because you can't get your foot out.

    I don't want to scare you, though. As previously said, after only a few rides, it does become second nature. I'd recommend that you not "learn" on the street or a trail. Find a nice, soft grass field and work on clipping in and out.
     
  10. 1parkpointer

    1parkpointer Guest

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    I am still using the stock regular pedals that came with my ride. As a real newbie to riding and mtn bikes, at what point during casual rides does the rider switch from regular slip off pedals to something with more control? Plus, does anyone make a double sided beginner lock-in pedal? I'd like to have more control under power, but I'm far from being any good at it, I just would like to know that my feet can on one side stay on the pedals.
     
  11. Xela

    Xela New Member Tavern Member

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    The majority of mountain bike pedals are two-sided. I would say the sooner you start to use them, the better. However, if you are still learning a lot about your bike such as proper shifting techniques, suspension set-up, etc; it might be a little too much for you to think about something else.

    But clipless are definitely nothing to be afraid of. I run Time ATAC pedals on my mtn bike. These pedals have easy engagement/disengagement plus they work great in all conditions. Some of the pedals out there are hard to engage/disengage in muddy conditions. Something to look out for and ask about as you pick your pedals.

    Again, as I said previously, when you first go clipless, find a soft, grassy area and just practice clipping in and out. After as little as a hour or less, you should have it down.
     
  12. 1parkpointer

    1parkpointer Guest

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    Road vs. Mountain Bike Pedals (page 2)

    Xela,

    I am still learning the ropes with this ride. I do however need to explore a pedal arrangement that will put some confidence on the rides. I'm a newbie and all that it applies, but I hate to be under power and slip off the pedal because it was wet or I wasn't on the securely enough.

    I'm due for a bike shop visit, I will bring this information with me. Thanks!!
     
  13. Xela

    Xela New Member Tavern Member

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    Sure, glad to help. Don't worry about asking any questions because you feel embarassed being a "newbie." We were all there once, and that's, in my opinion, what sites like this are all about.
     
  14. hewlett

    hewlett Guest

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    I like mountain.
     
  15. clemfan2001

    clemfan2001 Guest

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    I have found that road pedals work best for me. Basically, while i'm in a sprint, I can put all of my weight down and not worry about my feet coming off and bailing at 45+. I also ride long distance, even up to 100+ miles per day. I feel that road pedals are more comfortable, to me anyway. I ride Time RXE.
     
  16. VeloBliss

    VeloBliss Guest

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    This thread has lots of good input, but I will add mine in case it can be of service to anyone.

    I have noticed a significant difference in the feel of road pedals and mountain pedals in how the pedal/cleat connection feels. Mountain pedals are designed to have a bit of room for movement which is better for your knees and for pedal durability given the vibrations that are seen in mountain biking. Road pedals tend to have a firmer connection and with the bigger surface area, you can have a more comfortable (and theoretically efficient) shoe/pedal connection for the longer rides associated with road riding.

    Mountain pedals are definitely more versatile as you can walk in their shoes so they are nothing to be shunned, especially if you can afford carbon soled MTB shoe, which will help to cut down on potential hot spots.

    There has been mention about MTB pedals being easier to clip out, but it should be noticed that shimano pedals (both mountain and road) and look/keo (road pedals) have tension adjustments, and while the road pedals will not get as loose as the MTB pedals, the MTB pedals will get pretty secure. If this is a major concern for a road biker, I suggest looking at Speedplay pedals. They are wonderful.
     
  17. mtndoc

    mtndoc New Member

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    I ride a hybrid bike and I've tried a few different pedals, but wouldn't trade my shimano PD-M540's for any of the others I have tried. I like the security of my feet not coming off the pegs, but they unclip easily and quickly. I have hard soled specialized shoes, but with this type pedal the cleat is imbedded into the shoe and you can walk with ease. Hope this is some help
     

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  18. svenofthenorth

    svenofthenorth Junior Member

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    In my opinion road pedals provide better support for your feet. If you are going to spend hours on the bike the larger surface are seems to be easier on the feet. Bigger surface seems to equal less hot spots, at least for me. Although mtn. Bike pedals would probably be my choice for touring-easier walking in the shoes.
     
  19. jeepster93

    jeepster93 New Member

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    I have both road and mountain bike pedals, the spd type.

    I think that the mountain, being 2 sided, are easier the get into.
    The roads are lighter, harder to get into, but hold more firmly.

    I wear Specialized mountain bike shoes, the same pair, for both bikes.
     
  20. hophead

    hophead New Member Tavern Member

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    Me too--Specialized Pro Carbons. Definitely worth the $$$. They're 3 years old and lookin' kinda rough, but still going strong.