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JohnnieDorman
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Hello, fellow bicycle enthusiasts. My name is Johnnie Dorman, I am into the collectible Schwinn Stingrays, I own a Nov. 1963 Terra Catta Red and a 1973 Disc Brake Orange Krate, among several others, including a 1965 Sky Blue Deluxe and a 1967 Violet Deluxe. As a reasonably new Stingray collector, I have many questions that come up, hope that I can help others here with their questions as well. I live in Alhambra, CA. Happy biking everyone!
 

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Welcome. I know as a kid I always wanted one of those Stingrays that had the big gear shift lever that looked like a car. Oh I wanted one of those, but my parents couldn't afford it. A kid down the block got one and we found out why the government eventually banned that shifter.
 

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JohnnieDorman
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Dear photosbymark

I was also one of those kids whose parents were too poor to buy me a Schwinn Stingray, so we have something in common there. I ended up with one of those cheaper Mattel "Varoom" bikes instead. I guess that is the main reason I ended up with nine Stingrays that I have collected today, making up for what I missed in my youth, I suppose. Besides the Stingrays I mentioned, I also have a 1973 Flamboyant Red Stingray, a Yellow 1974, a yellow 1999 Country Time Lemonade that was contracted out by Schwinn to Giant Bicycles in Taiwan, and a 2007 Black Friday that was contracted out to a Chinese bike maker. I have at least one bike to represent each decade after the sixties.

The Schwinn Bicycle company story is atypical and a fine example of what happened to this country and its economic structure after 1979. A story that I wish never happened in and to America, but an interesting story nonetheless.

With all the changes that happened to Stingrays each and every year, it takes a great deal of study to know what is correct for the components of each Stingray. As a collector of these bikes, it is very easy to become confused about what is correct and what is not correct where all the parts are concerned. A heck of a learning curve is involved, but that is what makes these bikes so interesting. Yes, the Krates with the stick shift were banned because some children were trying to do stunts with the krates, which wasn't advisable with the Stingrays that have springer forks on the front in the first place. Only the regular Stingrays with solid front forks were right for jumping and other bicycle stunts. Many boys found themselves in the hospital with ruptured testicles because of the gear shift that is located on the top bar of the krates. There again is an example of how things are banned because of those that abuse things or use them the wrong way. Krates were mainly for cruising, not pulling wheelies or jumping.

Right now, I am facing a dilemma where my month of March issue 1973 Orange Krate is concerned. Seems that the early 1973 Orange Krates, like mine, were painted with the "cool orange" color and sometime later in the year the same bike was painted with the "sunset orange" paint. My Orange Krate was repainted with the cool orange paint and there has been other collectors that say my bike is the wrong color for a 1973 disc brake Stingray. I found a few other early in the year of 73 Orange krates that were painted with the cool orange color, and one in particular that was made in the same month mine was made. This seems to blow the minds of my friends that are also collectors. Wish I could get the real story about this, it sure is a brain tickler. Ha!

If anyone here knows what the real story is about this, I would appreciate some input on it. Thank you for your reply to my introduction, it is much appreciated. Hope to hear from you again and others here at this forum as well that are interested in the Schwinn Stingrays. Johnnie Dorman
 

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Welcome. I know as a kid I always wanted one of those Stingrays that had the big gear shift lever that looked like a car. Oh I wanted one of those, but my parents couldn't afford it. A kid down the block got one and we found out why the government eventually banned that shifter.
was that kid ever the same again?
 

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My first bike was a garbage picked Stingray with the stick shift from my grandfather. I remember it had the same size wheels front and rear with an orange banana seat and sissy bar with solid forks and chrome fenders (albeit pitted). All of the kids in the neighborhood teased me about my "bucket of bolts" but at the same time, they couldn't sit on their plastic BMX seats. This was circa 1988 or so. I rode that bike everywhere in the middle of the cassette (5 speed)?

Alex
 
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