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The local Boy Scouts are working on their cycling badge, and I got a visit from their Scoutmaster last night. I'll be holding a workshop next Wednesday to teach them whatever mechanical skills they need to get their badges.

Since these are Utah Scouts, I was advised to not enjoy a cold one while going over the finer details of bike maintenance. Sad, because that's really an essential component of repair. :rolleyes:
 

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What types of things will you be teaching them, since it won't be:
How to Open a Beer Bottle without a Bottle Opener 101.
 

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The requirements are to show what areas need lubrication, the ABC quick check, adjusting brakes, steerer and saddle.

Oddly, they don't seem to require that you show how to change a tube, but does require a total of 150 miles, including a 50 mile ride.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well, we went over bikes this week, and I have to work with them on some maintenance issues so they are ready for their ride next week. And we agreed that the sample safety checklist is due for an update. There's mention of coaster brakes, three speed hubs, and chain tension, but overall it's got a very old school look. Every bike but my demo bike had a suspension fork and derailleurs.
 

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They require a scout to ride a fifty miler?!?!!
Yes and no. They are not required to do the Cycling merit badge. It is an Eagle required merit badge if they haven't done Swimming or Hiking. (They can only choose one of the three as an Eagle required one, then if they choose to do one of the others, it is an elective.

In South Florida, most of my scouts choose to do the Swimming merit badge.

http://meritbadge.org/wiki/index.php/Cycling


  1. Show that you know first aid for injuries or illnesses that could occur while cycling, including hypothermia, heat reactions, frostbite, dehydration, insect stings, tick bites, snakebites, blisters, and hyperventilation.
  2. Clean and adjust a bicycle. Prepare it for inspection using a bicycle safety checklist. Be sure the bicycle meets local laws.
  3. Show your bicycle to your counselor for inspection. Point out the adjustments or repairs you have made. Do the following: a. Show all points that need oiling regularly. b. Show points that should be checked regularly to make sure the bicycle is safe to ride. c. Show how to adjust brakes, seat level and height, and steering tube.
  4. Describe how to brake safely with foot brakes and with hand brakes.
  5. Show how to repair a flat. Use an old bicycle tire.
  6. Take a road test with your counselor and demonstrate the following: a. Properly mount, pedal, and brake including emergency stops. b. On an urban street with light traffic, properly execute a left turn from the center of the street; also demonstrate an alternate left turn technique used during periods of heavy traffic. c. Properly execute a right turn. d. Demonstrate appropriate actions at a right-turn-only lane when you are continuing straight. e. Show proper curbside and road-edge riding. Show how to safely ride along a row of parked cars. f. Cross railroad tracks properly.
  7. Describe your state’s traffic laws for bicycles. Compare them with motor-vehicle laws. Know the bicycle-safety guidelines.
  8. Avoiding main highways, take two rides of 10 miles each, two rides of 15 miles each, and two rides of 25 miles each. You must make a report of the rides taken. List dates, routes traveled, and interesting things seen.*
  9. After fulfilling requirement 8, lay out on a road map a 50-mile trip. Stay away from main highways. Using your map, make this ride in eight hours.

  • The bicycle must have all required safety features. It must be registered as required by your local traffic laws.
 

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BTW Hack, you're a mensch for teaching this badge. I'm a scout leader, and was Scoutmaster of a troop for six years. My two oldest boys are Eagle Scouts, and my third is a Life Scout (one rank away from Eagle). I am currently the Advancement Director and Eagle Board of Review Chairman for our district.
 

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That is a LOT of information.
How are they handling it? Do you believe they are absorbing it all?
My 11 year old just crossed over.
Are you mostly dealing with the older boys?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
That is a LOT of information.
How are they handling it? Do you believe they are absorbing it all?
My 11 year old just crossed over.
Are you mostly dealing with the older boys?
They are all around13-14, and have varying attention spans. My hope is that their Scout leader will reinforce what they have learned. I really wanted to impress on them the versatility of the bicycle, and the important role it plays in other countries, particularly impoverished 3rd world nations. But that may be asking too much at this age.

One of them had a mechanical issue on Wednesday's ride, and brought his bike over for repair after. Since I'm already the neighborhood "bike guy", this isn't unusual. But I'm trying to engage them more, instead of just fixing it and sending them on their way.
 

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That is a LOT of information.
How are they handling it? Do you believe they are absorbing it all?
My 11 year old just crossed over.
Are you mostly dealing with the older boys?
The cycling merit badge isn't really an "entry" level badge. As an 11 year old crossover, your son will be focused on first year scouting skills and the ranks of Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class.

Usually some entry level badges include Cooking, Collections, Pets, Fingerprinting, Swimming and First Aid are usually the first two Eagle required badges boys down here earn.
 

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Garilia said:
The cycling merit badge isn't really an "entry" level badge. As an 11 year old crossover, your son will be focused on first year scouting skills and the ranks of Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class.

Usually some entry level badges include Cooking, Collections, Pets, Fingerprinting, Swimming and First Aid are usually the first two Eagle required badges boys down here earn.
Thanks.
I gave been sharing this info. with my son.
 
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