Sizing

Discussion in 'General Bike Discussion' started by Marmite, Aug 26, 2009.

  1. Marmite

    Marmite New Member

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    Hello, this is my first post here. I haven't ridden for 20 years and I'm going to get back on two wheels. I live in Japan and for my 183cm (6 feet) 95kg (210lb) body they don't sell properly fitting bikes so I have to import. I obviously don't need anything professional but I don't want to be lumbered with a *** either. I know everyone's advice is to ride a bike before you even think about buying it, but as you can see in my position that just isn't possible.

    So...I have found a bike that isn't too expensive, but I've never heard of the make (Cube) so no idea if they are any good (that would be my first question). I ran my statistics through competitivecyclist.com's fit calculator and got this:

    [​IMG]

    I have found this bike online (a Cube LTD CLS Pro 2009). They have 54cm and 58cm models in stock.

    At the Cube website I found these measurements for the two models they have in stock:

    [​IMG]
    and
    [​IMG]

    Could anyone help me interpret my measurements and tell me if either of these bikes would be suitable. As you see I am doing my research, but even though I realize I'm going to be taking a chance I feel like I'm running against a brick wall.

    Any help would be much appreciated from you pros.
    Thanks a lot.
     
  2. Xela

    Xela New Member Tavern Member

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    I was just in Germany this summer and those bikes were everywhere. Even the higher-end shops were carrying them and would put them on display in their windows. Some good looking bikes, too.
     

  3. Xela

    Xela New Member Tavern Member

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    Also, which of the three fits do you want? With it being a hybrid, I doubt you would want the Competitive Fit. Here's the difference between the three.

    1)The Competitive Fit.
    It's called the Competitive Fit because it's our signature fit. We've found that this is the look and the feel that most of our customers expect out of their new bike. This is the most "aggressive" fit and suits those with an interest in racing, fast club riding, as well as those with a greater measure of body flexibility to work within the racer's comfort zones. Most modern road bikes, like the majority we offer at Competitive Cyclist, are usually pictured in sales catalogues with the Competitive Fit. But this doesn't mean that you should ride a bike that looks or fits like this.

    Wanna look like a pro? This is the fit. It features a low, aerodynamic bar position that places slightly more weight on the hands than on the pedals and saddle, a close knee to pedal spindle ratio that emphasizes power and efficiency, and it puts the rider low in the handlebar drops. Typically the frame chosen will be the smallest that is appropriate. In fact, since the heyday of mountain bikes in the 1990s and more recent studies of professionals looking for an aerodynamic advantage, the Competitive Fit has become most bike shop's conventional wisdom.

    2)The Eddy Fit.
    Lots of folks find the Competitive Fit to be ideal. But for those who find its aerodynamic emphasis to be overly aggressive and uncomfortable, the Eddy Fit is almost certain to be ideal for you. It's a position that reminds us of the way Eddy Merckx looked on his bike in the early 1970s, and it dates from well before Eddy's time and continued in the pro peloton well into the 1980s.

    There is nothing "dated" about this style of riding. We all know that Eddy, Bernard, and Guiseppe were all very, very fast riders! Bike design has not, in fact, changed that radically since their time---only the look, the fashion, and the style of riding. The Eddy Fit is simply no longer the "fashion" among pros who keep pressing the envelope of comfort to create more efficiency and power.

    3)The French Fit.
    This fit is so named because of its legacy in the traditions of endurance road riding such as brevet rides and randonneuring. However, the French Fit isn't merely about touring, riding long, or even sitting more upright. It is about getting the most out of a bike that fits larger and provides much more comfort to the neck, back, and saddle position.

    While the Competitive Fit generally puts you on the smallest appropriate frame and the Eddy Fit sizes up a bit or raises the bars, the French Fit puts you on the largest appropriate frame.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2009
  4. Xela

    Xela New Member Tavern Member

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    Marmite, I just realized that Competitive has a different calculator for mountain bikes. I would base a hybrid fit more on those numbers rather than the ones for a road bike. The mtb fit is here.

    Fit Calculator - Competitive Cyclist
     
  5. Marmite

    Marmite New Member

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    OK , so I discovered another place that seems to stock bigger bikes. This time in Japan (though too far to visit)! A bit of background: when I went into a local pro shop the guy basically said they don't sell bikes in my size in Japan (unless I import, which is what the above posts are about). Period. All I could do, if I want a proper fit, is buy the largest possible (e.g. a few of the Giants are sold in L size) and add whatever it's called to make the handlebar further from the saddle. So since then I've been thinking that bikes sold in Japan are for smaller riders, even if they are the same make as sold in the West. For example, a 54cm in Japan is smaller than a 54cm in Japan. Maybe the length of the seat post is the same, but on the Japanese version my knees will hit the handlebar. That's how I've been thinking, but I could be completely wrong.

    Anyway, I found this bike 2009 FELT QX70, sold in 48, 52 and 55 sizes. These are the dimensions (hope your screens are big enough :eek:):

    [​IMG]

    If you notice at the bottom it says the 55 is suitable for height 185 to 205! How does that compute? I mean, the 54cm model of the Cube above is just about my size, so how can the 55 be too big? I'm very confused...

    Thanks for bearing with me folks.