Two Spoke Forums banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On my Tektro V brakes I am unable to turn the spring adjustment screw (below the cantilevers, to regulate the position of the pads on the rim) unless I first detach the spring. Rear brakes seem ok but I have this problem with the front brakes. The screw simply will not turn in the hole. Once I release the spring I'm able to turn the screw. I've studied it and can't see what the problem is.

Anything I can do to correct this?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,501 Posts
Are you talking about the screw labeled "Spring tension centering screw?"
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,501 Posts
I've never encountered that problem before. Try disconnecting the noodle to release tension and run the screw all the way in then back out. Maybe it has some locktite on it that is making it hard to turn under tension.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Update

Today I went to the bike shop to get the problem addressed. I received a stern lecture from the mechanic, who said that the spring must always be released before turning the adjusting screw, "otherwise you will break the brake." I didn't come across that fact anywhere in my research. Neither the LBS nor Tektro mentioned it when I talked with them.

So who's right about this? Are you supposed to have to release the spring before turning the screw, or not?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,501 Posts
Today I went to the bike shop to get the problem addressed. I received a stern lecture from the mechanic, who said that the spring must always be released before turning the adjusting screw, "otherwise you will break the brake." I didn't come across that fact anywhere in my research. Neither the LBS nor Tektro mentioned it when I talked with them.

So who's right about this? Are you supposed to have to release the spring before turning the screw, or not?
The Park Tool website disagrees with your mechanic.

 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,501 Posts
That guy in post five disagrees with the Park Tool site.
I'm not sure what you are getting at exactly since "that guy in post five" made no mention of releasing the spring tension either, a procedure which is completely foreign to me.

Sheldon Brown makes no mention of releasing the spring tension prior to adjustment.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,350 Posts
I'm not sure what you are getting at exactly since "that guy in post five" made no mention of releasing the spring tension either, a procedure which is completely foreign to me.

Sheldon Brown makes no mention of releasing the spring tension prior to adjustment.
As you mentioned in your earlier post, you need to release the noodle. That's what takes the tension off the springs. Depending on how much tension you have to begin with, it's really easy to crack that cheap little cast bit that the centering screw is attached to.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,501 Posts
As you mentioned in your earlier post, you need to release the noodle. That's what takes the tension off the springs. Depending on how much tension you have to begin with, it's really easy to crack that cheap little cast bit that the centering screw is attached to.
I'm not trying to be argumentative, but I think that my point is being missed.
Let me clarify:

The procedure that I was recommending was to attempt to free up the possibly binding adjustment screws. For simply adjusting freely moving centering screws it is not necessary to undo the noodle. After the screw is moving freely the noodle can be reattached and adjustments made. Those screws are often treated with blue Locktite which can make turning the screws a bit difficult, especially if your screw head takes a phillips/straight blade like this:

You will not likely have an issue adjusting brakes that have allen head adjustment screws like this:

Tektro are lower end brakes and most likely have the former screw interface.

I'm wrong plenty of times, but just to make sure, I checked several reliable sources before posting just to double check myself especially since the OP's mechanic was so adamant. The statement "the spring must always be released before turning the adjusting screw" is complete rubbish!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,350 Posts
Oh, I'm not arguing. I broke my rear brake, and know exactly what I did wrong. If you are backing that screw out, to shift the brakes away, there is no need to remove the noodle. If you are twisting that screw in, to pull the brakes towards the adjusting side on cheaper brakes, it's best to remove the noodle, since you'll be fighting the spring on the opposite arm, and will likely over-tighten and break something.

Learn from my mistake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I think you're both right

Hophead and Industry Hack, you are both making sense to me. I think you're saying that under good circumstances, you should be able to simply turn the adjusting screw. But if there is too much pressure from the spring, or the screw has Locktite on it, you might not be able to turn the screw and to attempt it will result in breaking . . . something. In that case the thing to do is to relieve that pressure.

The one thing I don't understand is, would releasing the noodle have about the same effect as releasing the spring? All went well when I released the spring. It was just a little tedious to do that about 5 or 6 times before getting the brakes centered just right.

In fact my Tekro brake was treated with blue Locktite, and the screw was the phillips/slot head. It wasn't that hard to mangle the screw.

The mechanic in question seemed like a somewhat hysterical individual, prone to sweeping statements and overassertiveness. Direct quote: "Well, I guess I know more than all those websites and Tektro, don't I?" I think if it were generally necessary to release the spring, that would be clearly stated somewhere by someone.

Tektro is low end, huh? Sigh . . . Nice folks though.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,350 Posts
I think it's really only an issue if you're turning the screw in, not out.

Tektro makes some decent brakes, but I don't think their MTB brakes are anything special.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,501 Posts
The one thing I don't understand is, would releasing the noodle have about the same effect as releasing the spring? All went well when I released the spring. It was just a little tedious to do that about 5 or 6 times before getting the brakes centered just right.
Yes, same thing.
In fact my Tekro brake was treated with blue Locktite, and the screw was the phillips/slot head. It wasn't that hard to mangle the screw.
That's the real problem here. Those screws can be very hard to turn, especially with a phillips head screw driver. The screw driver tip tends to want to slip out of the screw head. If you are using a phillips head, try a regular head driver. Even better, replace them with allen head screws.
The mechanic in question seemed like a somewhat hysterical individual, prone to sweeping statements and overassertiveness. Direct quote: "Well, I guess I know more than all those websites and Tektro, don't I?" I think if it were generally necessary to release the spring, that would be clearly stated somewhere by someone.
Hmmmm, makes one wonder where this mechanic obtained his vast wealth of knowledge.
Tektro is low end, huh? Sigh . . . Nice folks though.
"Low end" components often mean heavy, not poor quality. I've never had any problems with Tektro v-brakes so no worries.
 

·
DX's Biggest Member
Joined
·
793 Posts
Ah, that mechanic is full of it.

Little tough to even out the tension on those babies when you have to re-position the spring or the noodle every turn of the screw... I'd NEVER get anything done!

BTW, my Tektro's are pretty easy to adjust, almost as easy as my daughter's Avid's. Beat the living hell outta ProMax!
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top