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Discussion Starter #1
I am trying to take an SRAM back derailleur off of a mountain bike to put on my road bike, the derailleur is a drop frame fixture (I think that's the terminology), meaning that it doesn't screw on next to the frame where the wheel is placed but underneath it by less than an inch, we've all seen them.

The problem is I cannot figure out how to get the chain off of the derailleur, I do not have the tool to pinch out a gap in the chain, I'd rather take off one of the pulleys. I have included pictures to illustrate why I cannot figure out how to get the pulleys off. What type of driver or wrench do I use?

Thank you.

Looking at the derailleur from the front.


Back side position #1.


Back side position #2.
 

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The chain is no good anyway. Get the tool and a new chain if the budget is tight. I would probably just get a new rear derailleur as well. Probably have fewer issues long term to put a road bike derailleur on a road bike
 

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Two skinny J's
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Discussion Starter #9
Fellas, I'm asking about the derailleur assembly, obviously the chain is toast.

Question is answered, close thread.
 

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I think what you missed is that derailleur wasn't meant to be taken apart to put another chain through. The chain was broken into and threaded through the derailleur and then the link put back together. That derailleur has seen better days anyway, so I would recommend replacing it as well. Some lower end versions are less than $20 and Forte makes one that I think I paid less than $40 that is a bit more robust. You probably would be better off to get a new derailleur as well, but that's up to you. Either way you are going to need a chain tool to break the chain to feed it through. While you are at it, look at the cage of your front derailleur and you are likely to find that the chain runs through a metal box that has no way to disassemble. That bar that keeps the chain from dropping too far is most often cast, welded, stamped or otherwise made as to keep any part of that derailleur from being removed to allow the chain to pass through. You either have to break the chain or cut the derailleur.
 
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