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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone ever steam cleaned there chain? I just bought a steam mop for doing floors and it separates into a hand held with an attachment for small areas.
I tried it on my chain on my hybrid and it worked pretty well I'm curious if anyone else has tried this.
 

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To be honest, never even thought about it. I suppose it would work but you'd need to lubricate asap though.
 

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I'm sure there's something worse you could do to a chain, but I can't imagine what it would be....
 

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So basically, you're working water into the tightest spots of your chain, in order to remove the last traces of lube? ;)
Exactly. There's only one place on a chain that needs lube, and that's inside the rollers: between the roller and pin and roller and side plates.

Personally, I never, ever "degrease" a chain. I'll wipe down the outside of it, but I leave the lube inside the rollers alone, only adding new lube as needed and wiping down the outside.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well I disagree with your assessment after you clean it you will lube it again and the lube will go back into the rollers. I would think that by just wiping the outside and then oiling it your moving the grit in side and mixed with oil your making lapping compound and it would wear more. To me its no different than a dry chain that needs to be lubed I'm curious that you think its the worse thing you could ever do that I would be removing the last traces of lube and replacing with water yet when I lube the chain the lube will not penetrate back into the rollers.
 

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Two skinny J's
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Short answer, no.

I would stay with a citrus cleaner or solvent based cleaner. Wipe and lube frequently and avoid the squeaky issues :)

I think this is a good way of saying it:

The best way to know when to lube is by listening to your bike. Literally. A clean, lubed chain runs nearly silent, especially in gears where the chain is straightest. Your chain will sound dry when it needs a drink of your favorite lube.

When you do apply, make sure you don’t overdo it. I see that a lot. You also need to make sure that you’re lubing the chain rollers and not the outer or inner plates. It’s best to lube your chain after a ride as opposed to before it. Let that oil penetrate into the rollers overnight. Pedal your bike slowly while shifting across all your gears and then wipe off the excess.

The only thing lubing before a ride accomplishes is flinging lube all over your drivetrain, frame and wheels. Not a great thing.

http://velonews.competitor.com/2011/12/bikes-and-tech/ask-nick/ask-nick-derailleur-installation-indoor-maintenance-cassette-adjustments_200146
 

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Well I disagree with your assessment after you clean it you will lube it again and the lube will go back into the rollers. I would think that by just wiping the outside and then oiling it your moving the grit in side and mixed with oil your making lapping compound and it would wear more. To me its no different than a dry chain that needs to be lubed I'm curious that you think its the worse thing you could ever do that I would be removing the last traces of lube and replacing with water yet when I lube the chain the lube will not penetrate back into the rollers.
Getting lube into the rollers - and getting the PROPER lube back into the rollers - is more difficult than you might think.

Lots of people use homebrew - motor oil mixed with denatured mineral spirits. That would be like draining the transfer case on your 4x4 truck and replacing the gear oil with kerosene. Chains need a thick lube on the rollers; unless you're going to lube the chain every time you ride.

Me, I use Chain-L on my own chains, as well as the team members' chains. It's basically 90W gear lube.

My chains last around 4000-5000 miles, in case you're wondering.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I am curious how you get a 90 weight oil in the rollers if it is so hard to get lube back into the rollers. Chains wear from dirt and grit in the rollers it only takes .0011 wear on each pin and roller on a chain with 106 pins to grow by 1/8. Since you are getting that kind of mileage out of the chain you must be getting lube back in the rollers because factory lube is not going to last that long.
 

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I am curious how you get a 90 weight oil in the rollers if it is so hard to get lube back into the rollers. Chains wear from dirt and grit in the rollers it only takes .0011 wear on each pin and roller on a chain with 106 pins to grow by 1/8. Since you are getting that kind of mileage out of the chain you must be getting lube back in the rollers because factory lube is not going to last that long.
The chain goes into a toaster oven set on 250°. The Chain-L bottle is placed in a pan of hot water. I stretch the chain out straight, put 1 drop on each link, and let it sit for 10 minutes. Then I wipe the chain down, put it on the bike, spin it around a few times, wipe it down again, and then it's good for about 1000 miles.
 

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Yesterday tired old man, Today retired old man
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There are many type of motorcycle chain lubes that are verry thin when you spray them and get thick when thay sit a few minutes, PJ1 comes to mind it will penetrate a O ring chain . Might be easyer than heating the chain and oil
 

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The heating part isn't really needed. You can leave the chain sitting for an hour and capillary action will draw the oil in on its own. Due to time constraints in a shop though, I like to get it done as quickly as possible.
 

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I like the idea of heating the chain prior to application. May give it a try next time, though need to make sure I don't use the wife's best cookie tray.

As for Chain-L, I have been using it since Christmas and it seems to be doing a great job, especially with the chain getting nowhere near as dirty. Time will tell on chain wear though I expect more miles based on other reviews.
 

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I like the idea of heating the chain prior to application. May give it a try next time, though need to make sure I don't use the wife's best cookie tray.

As for Chain-L, I have been using it since Christmas and it seems to be doing a great job, especially with the chain getting nowhere near as dirty. Time will tell on chain wear though I expect more miles based on other reviews.
The best thing about Chain-L (aside from the 1000 mile reapplication intervals) is the lack of noise. The chain is completely silent. You'll never get that from a thin lube.
 

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Two skinny J's
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I tried it once and at first thought there was nothing better. After a couple of rides and more wiping than I could bear I cleaned it all off. It seemed no matter how much I wiped and cleaned I ended up with oil allover my bike and me. I went to White Lightening Epic Ride and have been happy for the past couple of years with it :D

It's not that it was a bad product, just more than I wanted to deal with.


Chain-L
 

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I got a great deal on White Lightning from Supergo in Los Angeles, only to have TSA remove it from my bag before boarding a flight to Australia. D'oh!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
The chain goes into a toaster oven set on 250°. The Chain-L bottle is placed in a pan of hot water. I stretch the chain out straight, put 1 drop on each link, and let it sit for 10 minutes. Then I wipe the chain down, put it on the bike, spin it around a few times, wipe it down again, and then it's good for about 1000 miles.
I still don't get it you gave me 3 reasons its the worst thing you could ever do to a chain.
1 I remove all the oil from the rollers and pins.
2 I force water in to tight spots.
3. and its harder than you think to get oil back in there.

In your own post you proved you can get oil back in the rollers and pins fairly easily.
I force water into tight spots a quick spray with denatured alcohol would dissipate any remaining water.
I have been a machinist/ machine builder for 33 years and as any good mechanic you are always learning something new but you still have not gave me a reason its the worst thing you can do to a chain.
I am just trying to understand why you think that.
 
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