Two Spoke Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello-
it's spring again and I've wheeled out my old bike. I'm hoping to actually venture off the driveway this summer- after I install a bike carrier on the car.
My bike is 30 years old, and there are numerous scratches in the paint which have surface rust. It's got decals and badges that I don't want to lose by getting the bike stripped/repainted. It's a rare bike but I don't think its actually valuable, except to me. Is there a way to stop the rust without repainting the bike?
Any suggestions would be welcome
Suzy
 

Attachments

·
Total noob (& forum admin)
Joined
·
12,350 Posts
Your local auto parts store will have a rust neutralizer, and your local drugstore might have some touch-up paint. But it will be labeled "nail polish".

Welcome to the forums!
 

·
Rat Biker
Joined
·
432 Posts
Chances are if you got a good hobby shop near by they might be your best bet for a touch up paint check in the military model colors. As Hack said go to the auto parts store for a small battle of stuff called rust converter. It won't fully stop the rust but if surface it will greatly slow it down. Nice lookin ride to sorta looks like my Sonic
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the advice on rust converter/neutralizer! Do I need to use that and still paint over the scratches to protect it? or is the paint just for looks?
The original paint has always been matte, rather than glossy. And that color is going to be a nightmare to match. I can live with the scruffy look, I'm more worried the rust will spread and destroy my bike :-(
 

·
Rat Biker
Joined
·
432 Posts
It actually might not be to hard to match the paint try Krylon camo green paint. Yes you do need to paint over the converter and ya really just need to put it on the rusty areas. Prime the areas after you put the rust converter on then shoot it with some paint that color shouldn't be all that hard to match the Krylon caom olive drab you can get at just about any Wally World. take some pics of the bike as you go would love seeing it done up good luck and take your time
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks bikebum1975. I'll check out the camo colors of Krylon.
If I end up having to paint it...I have some phosphors I could add to a clear to puts some glow-in-the-dark accents on it :)
 

·
Rat Biker
Joined
·
432 Posts
Sounds like a cool project I do dig the color of the bike myself :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,223 Posts
You also may be able to get the paint guy in an auto body shop to mix some that will exactly match. Maybe expensive, or it might be the type of thing that he will give you a half cup and say come back to see us when you car breaks. Either way its probably going to give you the best match. I know Lowes and Home Depot can do a scan and match house paint, but I don't think they can do it with metal paints.
 

·
spin... spin.. spin
Joined
·
1,613 Posts
You also may be able to get the paint guy in an auto body shop to mix some that will exactly match. Maybe expensive, or it might be the type of thing that he will give you a half cup and say come back to see us when you car breaks. Either way its probably going to give you the best match. I know Lowes and Home Depot can do a scan and match house paint, but I don't think they can do it with metal paints.
a high end paint shop can match colors in auto paint and put it in a spray can...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Supposedly they are hydraulic brakes. Another reason I don't want to dismantle the bike and repaint it; I dont want to disturb the brake lines. Once the brakes go, that's it. they can't be repaired or replaced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
567 Posts
Wow..surprised noone suggested Naval Jelly. Cheap and available at Walmart, Home Depot..etc etc. Can be brushed or sprayed on rust. Been around for 45 years.

Naval jelly is an often pink gel made from phosphoric acid. It is used to remove rust from metal surfaces and is most often encountered marketed as a rust remover.

Phosphoric Acid....

The main ingredient in naval jelly is phosphoric acid, more properly called orthophosphoric acid. This chemical is a relatively weak acid, often used in processed foods such as colas.

Purpose....

Naval jelly is used to dissolve rust from ferrous metals. Because it does not drip and washes off easily with the application of water, it is used on machinery and vehicles.

Chemical Mechanism....

Naval jelly converts the iron oxide rust on a ferrous surface into a black compound called ferric phosphate. Ferric phosphate does not stick to the surface and can be easily washed off.

Use....

After cleaning a surface, brush naval jelly onto the rusted area. After about 10 minutes, wash it off, leaving a clean metal surface behind.

Safety...

Phosphoric acid does pose some safety risks. Contact with skin or eyes should be avoided. However, if contact occurs, the acid can be washed off with water.

A fascinating look at <b>Naval Jelly Rust Dissolver</b> - Naval Jelly Rust Dissolver 8 oz - Epinions.com
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top