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Discussion Starter #1
Picked up a pair of Innova studded tires ... cheap ... in July. (ebay)

Cost me about $40 for the pair, including shipping. I wasn't very impressed with design, but hey, couldn't beat the price. Have to give them a try.

First, there are plenty of studs, 1 every 3/4", but I feel they are placed too close to the center. I fear they will wear down from constant abrasion. Ideally they should make only minimal contact on a straight run. That way they will be fresh and sharp on any sort of turn, where they are most needed. Presently, both rows of studs contact, on the straight, any turn lifts one set, effectively halving the, "stud" traction.

Just started snowing yesterday so I winterized one of my EZip Mountain trailz. The studded tires make a very noticeable noise, not sure what to compare it to, but at slow speed it sounds almost identical to microwaved popcorn.

The tires are only 1.75" but that should make them cut through the snow and let the studs cut into the underlying ice. Unfortunately, with no snow, I'm a bit fearful of cornering too fast. I keep thinking about steel studs sliding on cold wet blacktop, ... maybe I'm just paranoid?



Also bought another pair of tires, over the summer. They are possibly the poorest attempt at studded tires that I can imagined. I will post pictures ... soon.
:cool:
 

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Yesterday tired old man, Today retired old man
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Better than I was thinking, some roofing nails and tire liners for the old Huffy :rolleyes: :D
 

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I did the stud thing years and yeas ago with sheetmetal screws and duct tape to protect the tube. Then when I mounted them up the studs hit the triangle so I did some grinding on them to shorten them up and then hit the road. Mine were about as close together but I carried them across the tread surface so even on a good lean the studs were making contact with the ground. I used them on clear pavement and concrete, ice, snow and packed snow. The best handling was on the packed snow. A few times one ice the bike still went out from under me. I never had it happen on pavement or concrete. The reason I said best handling was on packed snow is there was no noise from the studs as it made lots of noise on the dry pavement. But it also gripped very well. I only spun out a few times when I leaned to far forward on a hill and put the power to the tire. it was easily corrected by leaning back and loading the tire and it went right on.

The best thing about it was staying in the seat, shifting down and riding up a steep ice and snowpacked hill around the cars who had spun out and couldn't go anywhere. The looks on their faces as I eased around them and went up the hill was priceless.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Worst Studded Tire Design

Drumroll please, ......... and now, the studded tires, apparently designed to showcase, every flawed design possibility!



What's so wrong about them?

Well, first off, these studs are aluminum! Not only will salt eat them away, quickly, but they will wear away almost immediately on blacktop, even faster on concrete! AAAND! As soon as the studs are worn away, the pan type "stud holders" will let you slide easily, even on the driest roads.



It appears that they used a fairly large drill, which cut through many of the threads that give the tire its support, strength, reliability, etc. Oops!, looks like it will need about 3 layers of liner, to protect the tube. Yes, the studs, are actually, aluminum pop rivets!



It seems, someone might, actually be proud of their design!



I plan on keeping these, as a novelty. But, if anyone dares to claim this to be a good design, I will threaten to sell, to them!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Home made Studded tires! Ha Ha HA! (evil laugh!)

First off, my Innova studded tires are working satisfactorily. But I never want to become complacent, sooo ... I decided to try my hand at making studded tires.

Plan of action:
Surprisingly, the aluminum pop rivet debacle, help guide me away-towards many good-bad ideas.

Avoid:
1. Drill will cut-damage the ply-cords
2. anything jagged-pointy against tube
3. screws in center

Use:
1. Screw with wide-low profile head
2. Screw with wide deep threads

I found 2 candidates: #8x1/2"



The screws fit nice and flush to the tire, hopefully with their wide heads, the tube will help support them nicely.



For my first attempt I decided to use one of my swapped out EZip tires.



The "studs" look nasty, I thought about grinding them down some, but I believe I'll just wait for the next heavy snow-ice storm.



I didn't over do it on quantity, this is just a test item. 100 of these sharp little screws and 8 bloody fingers later, I have my prototype!



I left the center "stud free", straight line riding requires very little extra traction. My stud pattern will wear some, on the straight but studs will cut deeply on slight turn, and outer row will dig in, on sharper turn. Lowering tire pressure will allow outer row to hit with a lighter turn.


PS - I just found the same type screw in 3/8" length, which should work perfectly for the inner rows!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Studs should barely touch on the straight, dig in firmly, on a slight turn, and second row joining first row, on a heavier turn.

Next trial will be with tires with larger knobbies, better target and support for screws.

I just found some, same type screws, with 3/8" length. They should be the perfect length for the inner rows!
 

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ViBiker,

How did you locate where to place the screws so that they would be in the ribs? Please keep us posted. Do you have steel re-inforced bibs to protect your soft tissue if you come incontact with said tire?

BobH.
 

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I left the center "stud free", straight line riding requires very little extra traction. My stud pattern will wear some, on the straight but studs will cut deeply on slight turn, and outer row will dig in, on sharper turn. Lowering tire pressure will allow outer row to hit with a lighter turn. [/COLOR]

PS - I just found the same type screw in 3/8" length, which should work perfectly for the inner rows!
You will need studs making contact for straight line riding. One to help you go forward, you will find that the studs are needed. The real issue will be not with going but with stopping. No studs will cause you to skid and slide around until you lose control and start to fall over and the side studs catch.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
ViBiker,

How did you locate where to place the screws so that they would be in the ribs? Please keep us posted. Do you have steel re-inforced bibs to protect your soft tissue if you come incontact with said tire?

BobH.
Problem ... yes.
I wanted to avoid drilling.
My solution was to pre-screw all the holes, from outside, first.
Yes, almost triple the work, screwing - unscrewing - rescrewing.
I did have trouble spotting the screw hole, hard to spot.

Future method projected - caliper type device with felt tip marker!
Simply align contact at 1/4", place metal prong on "rib" - knobby, close marker prong, to mark inner screw point.

Yes, the screws are very sharp, they are designed to poke-cut-drill their way through sheet metal. No cuts-tears, lots of little pokes!
 

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Yesterday tired old man, Today retired old man
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Looking Good. What are you using for tire liners on top of the screws?? I like the screw idea a lot :thumbsup:
 

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I only rode 3 miles today, the roads were slick with ice, I took me an hour. I came close to busting my butt several times. Those studded tires look better ans better!

BobH.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I am waiting for the arrival of my 3/8" screws before trying my "homemade" studded tires. Protrusion on inner ribs will be reduced from 1/4", to a more reasonable 1/8". Still, initial trial will be on ice, or at least, accumulated snow. At full pressure, studs will still make heavy contact on level travel. After normal wear, contact should still be reasonable on the straight and substantial on any lean, (turn). Better contact can be supplied with a minor pressure reduction. Re-pressurize for clearer roads ... etc.
Guess I should carry a small CO2 "pump".
 

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Studded tires

Hello - I live where we get snow fairly often. I am not able to drive (seizures) so my bike is my main form of transportation. if you are using the studded tires on snow the wear will be pretty slow. if you ride them on wet or dry pavement you will have 2 problems. you will wear them out very quickly and you will have a very unstable wheel when cornering. the solution is to buy a second pair of wheels and put those on when the weather calls for it. don't get anything fancy. something in the middle of the road will work fine.

Happy riding,

Gary B.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
First "trial" tire will be placed on front. All reports, and my experience, insist that best traction is needed on the front. If the back tire loses its grip, it is called "fun"! If the front tire ... it is called "ouch!"

Screws should have good wearability on ice and snow, not so good on clear roads. I intend on keeping a spare wheel-tire handy, not a quick change hub, but my practice change time is well under 5 min. If a few changes double the life of my studs, it will be well worth it! (Yes, I do my changes in a nice warm interior area.)

My testbed is an EZip electric bike, it has a, rear, geared external motor, something of a job to swap the tire. Still it is slated for SMS (Sheet Metal Studding), as soon as concept is proven, and stud wear determined.

Also, as studs are becoming "worn" a second ring of fresh studs can be added, ... then, a third! My source for the screws charges $6 shipping for the first 200 screws, but the additional 5 boxes (1000 screws) were free shipping. My prototype used only 100 screws, adding screws to all the inner row of knobbies will, only, finish off the 1st box.
 

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Drumroll please, ......... and now, the studded tires, apparently designed to showcase, every flawed design possibility!



What's so wrong about them?

Well, first off, these studs are aluminum! Not only will salt eat them away, quickly, but they will wear away almost immediately on blacktop, even faster on concrete! AAAND! As soon as the studs are worn away, the pan type "stud holders" will let you slide easily, even on the driest roads.



It appears that they used a fairly large drill, which cut through many of the threads that give the tire its support, strength, reliability, etc. Oops!, looks like it will need about 3 layers of liner, to protect the tube. Yes, the studs, are actually, aluminum pop rivets!



It seems, someone might, actually be proud of their design!



I plan on keeping these, as a novelty. But, if anyone dares to claim this to be a good design, I will threaten to sell, to them!

With all due respect, you sir, should remember that a studded bike tire is a specialty beast and if you desire to ride in that kind of stuff you should not expect any bicycle tire manufacturer to cater to your insanity. Criticize all you wish but even the best companies, such as Schwalbe, will not be too sympathetic to your whoes....

Just saying
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
With all due respect, you sir, should remember that a studded bike tire is a specialty beast and if you desire to ride in that kind of stuff you should not expect any bicycle tire manufacturer to cater to your insanity. Criticize all you wish but even the best companies, such as Schwalbe, will not be too sympathetic to your whoes....

Just saying
Whaaa! ... ???

Are you saying that cyclists should stop enjoying the great outdoors, just because it is covered with ice and snow?

Or!

Are you conceding that an individual, can, with a couple hours thought and work, develop and build a better studded tire than the "best companies, such as Schwalbe"! ... ???

???! ... !???
 

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Whaaa! ... ???

Are you saying that cyclists should stop enjoying the great outdoors, just because it is covered with ice and snow?

Or!

Are you conceding that an individual, can, with a couple hours thought and work, develop and build a better studded tire than the "best companies, such as Schwalbe"! ... ???

???! ... !???
No, and yes.

I will be happy to see the results of your efforts and would be pleased to go out in "the ugly" with you on a ride. Thanks for not getting pissed at me and please know that my comments are always meant to be friendly in nature, even if I might disagree at times.
 

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by the way, your pictures of the tire in question are great.....but your hand in picture two, the one holding the tire, kinda sorta, is a bit......interesting? Maybe it's just my imagination combined with a dirty mind.

Regardless....thanks for your reply and keep on biking !!!
 

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With great apologies, one more comment: You are correct about that studded tire thing and your pictures prove the point. If all they do is to rivet studs on without making any compensation for tube wear on the inside then that product will be a no-win deal.

I really like riding in the snow and such but only when I am on the three wheels that my Catrike Expedition has......on the Cat the studded tires only get in the way of fun.
 
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