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What you got likely was the Walmart assembly. I have had to redo nearly everything on those before. You have to remember they got the guy that was caught up from stocking shelves and happened to have a few minutes to put together the bikes. May have never done it before, and might not ever do it again.
 

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Unless it's much smaller than the picture portrays it to be, that bike is way too big for a 4 year old to ride. I just noticed that there is a 18 on the seat post tube, is that an 18" bike? If so then it looks a lot bigger in the picture than it really is.
 

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Total noob (& forum admin)
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Unless it's much smaller than the picture portrays it to be, that bike is way too big for a 4 year old to ride. I just noticed that there is a 18 on the seat post tube, is that an 18" bike? If so then it looks a lot bigger in the picture than it really is.
You don't have kids. :)
 

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retromike3
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harder than you think

The problem I always have when I assemble less expensive bicycles is that it requires much more work to get them to a point where everything works smoothly. The tolerances between very bad and working correctly on these bikes is very small.

When I was working at Fred Meyer I saw them assemble over 100 bicycles in an afternoon. They did it with air tools. At my shop I could put together about four bicycles a day,this was in between repairs and helping customers.

Sometimes it would take me all day to assemble one bike. I remember building a DeRosa with all Chorus equipment.The first thing that I did was to face the headset and bottom bracket.I also had alignment tools for the front and rear dropouts and a few frame alignment tools because sometimes UPS actually does a oops. I then had to build the wheels, and then assemble all the components on the bicycle. This was quite a job, but for me a lot of fun. it would be a lot easier to work in a bicycle shop if all of the bicycles you had to fix were top-of-the-line. For every Kline there are 500 Walmart bikes. Some shops will not work on a department store bike, but I wasn't that particular. If I thought the bike was rideable and it looked worth doing I give it a try.

I'm a little more picky now since for me now it's a glorified hobby. I still remember my hands aching after working on so many dirty Huffy's. For a while I was thinking of giving customers a $10 discount if they brought their bikes in clean.

But that was then and I'm a little slower now but hopefully just as thorough.

Mike
 

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You don't have kids. :)
I have two boys actually, 6 and 3. That is why when I noticed that it was a 18" bike I changed my response to it looked bigger in the picture than it really was.
 

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I have two boys actually, 6 and 3. That is why when I noticed that it was a 18" bike I changed my response to it looked bigger in the picture than it really was.
With kids that age, you should know that there's a whole assortment of bikes with 20" wheels and under. You've gotten your boys bikes, haven't you? :eek:
 
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