The far right

Discussion in 'Activism / Safety' started by rola643, May 17, 2020.

  1. rola643

    rola643 Two skinny Js Staff Member Admin Staff Mod Team Tavern Member

    20,465
    8,878
    113
    This is the problem in a nutshell. I think we as cyclists get it but getting the local PD and general motoring public to understand is yet another issue we deal with.

    Like so many believe:

    I was under the belief, like probably many bicyclists and motorists, that bicyclists should and/or belong riding on the far-right edge of the roadway much of the time. This is sometimes referred to as the “Far to the Right” or FTR law. This is where many bicyclists and society believe bikes belong as a slower, narrow vehicle. Does the law require it? Is that the safest place for bicyclists to be? I bet you will be surprised!

    This is generally my biggest issue locally

    (3) When reasonably necessary to avoid conditions (including, but not limited to, fixed or moving objects, vehicles, bicycles, pedestrians, animals, surface hazards, or substandard width lanes) that make it unsafe to continue along the right-hand curb or edge, subject to the provisions of Section 21656. For purposes of this section, a “substandard width lane” is a lane that is too narrow for a bicycle and a vehicle to travel safely side by side within the lane


    Read it all here

    https://www.newsmirror.net/news/for...cle_2cb9cfbc-9561-11ea-8420-bf87c0adf9b7.html
     
    John_V likes this.
  2. maelochs

    maelochs Old, fat, and slow

    579
    1,148
    93
    Section 5(a) http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Statutes...g=&URL=0300-0399/0316/Sections/0316.2065.html

    (5)(a) Any person operating a bicycle upon a roadway at less than the normal speed of traffic at the time and place and under the conditions then existing shall ride in the lane marked for bicycle use or, if no lane is marked for bicycle use, as close as practicable to the right-hand curb or edge of the roadway except under any of the following situations:
    1. When overtaking and passing another bicycle or vehicle proceeding in the same direction.
    2. When preparing for a left turn at an intersection or into a private road or driveway.
    3. When reasonably necessary to avoid any condition or potential conflict, including, but not limited to, a fixed or moving object, parked or moving vehicle, bicycle, pedestrian, animal, surface hazard, turn lane, or substandard-width lane, which makes it unsafe to continue along the right-hand curb or edge or within a bicycle lane. For the purposes of this subsection, a “substandard-width lane” is a lane that is too narrow for a bicycle and another vehicle to travel safely side by side within the lane.

    I have researched this statute in about 2/3 of the continental states (so I cuold argue with cops while riding there :) ) and every state I checked had a very similar version.
     
    rola643, newleaf150 and John_V like this.

  3. maelochs

    maelochs Old, fat, and slow

    579
    1,148
    93
    What that breaks down to is that you can operate on Any portion of the roadway, legally, so long as you have anything even vaguely approaching a reasonable explanation. If you block traffic to be a richard, you Should get ticketed .... because frustrated angry drivers endanger everyone. if you are "taking the lane" because you are rounding a narrow blind curve and you don't want some airhead idiot to try to pass, then panic and run you over when a car comes the other way, you are completely justified in doing so.

    It is (in my opinion) courteous to let cars get by unimpeded, as well as being safer for me, as a cyclist. Even if there were No laws ... wouldn't you let a car pass you instead of keeping it behind you for half an hour for no reason? And if you were driving, wouldn't you expect that? Simple compassion.

    I started "taking the lane" before I fully read the local traffic laws, way back when, because I could see that sometimes it was literally a life-threatening situation not to---riding though deep puddles that extended almost all the way across the lane, in the rain, while cars were passing a 45-55 mph. if I skidded on paint, sand, gravel, a branch, Anything hidden under the water's surface .... i would likely fall right in front of a car trying to pass me less than two feet away and traveling so fast that I would get run over by the next car in line before the first driver hit the brakes.

    With that being one option, the option of blocking traffic seemed safer ....

    But I was always looking for a chance to pull over and let the cars by once a bunch of them backed up behind me ... because you know some chucklehead who was seven cars back and had no clue, would pull out and try to pass the whole line ahead, in the oncoming traffic lane, at 75 mph, in the hard rain, just because that driver couldn't see any reason not to go fast (which is the absolute right of every driver, right?)

    I didn't want some idiot to try to pass seven cars, see a car coming head-on, and then hit me trying to get out of the way of the oncoming car .... so I got good at learning were there were safe places to pull over and let some pressure off.

    Imagine my surprise to find that lawmakers, so normally completely useless and out of touch with reality, had actually made a law allowing for that.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2020
    rola643, newleaf150 and John_V like this.
  4. John_V

    John_V Moderator Staff Member Mod Team Tavern Member

    9,639
    3,604
    113
    When I'm on the road, I stay in bike lanes unless: a) I'm making a left turn at an intersection or private property (store, eatery etc) b) there is no bike lane. If there is no bike lane, I was riding as far right as I safely could but since I no longer ride without my radar on public roads, I'll ride in the middle of the lane until my radar signals an approaching vehicle. Depending on the vehicle's speed, I have roughly 4 to 6 seconds from the time the vehicle is detected to the time the vehicle passes me. On multi-lane roads, I try and stay as close to the right as possible because the radar only warns me of approaching vehicles but doesn't tell me what lane their in. If there are any hazards in the roadway, I've got the lane and the vehicle can wait for me to clear the hazards.
     
    rola643, MilesR and maelochs like this.
  5. newleaf150

    newleaf150 Deranged Touring Cyclist Tavern Member

    5,088
    1,770
    113
    I've learned about this the harder way. I hate obstructing traffic, but it's worse to be squeeze passed by a 3/4 ton pickup towing a boat bigger than it is. That's what it took in my case. I understood taking the lane intellectually, but still instinctively faded right in deference to the overtaking traffic. Never again.

    I regularly defer to automobiles' ability to move faster than I can when I can do so without inviting a collision. Most of the time, it's not a big deal. I've also been tailgated by a full sized pickup over a freeway overpass, heard many horn exercises, and been cussed out a few times. All of that is way better than inviting a squeeze pass.
     
    John_V, fpl1, maelochs and 1 other person like this.
  6. fpl1

    fpl1 Well-Known Member Tavern Member

    6,663
    4,017
    113
    Our laws in Tennessee are fairly liberally written to allow riders to take the lane at times. I do often on more narrow roads where it’s just not safe for a car to pass me. I just try to use common sense and let cars go by as much as possible if the roads safely permit.

    In Tennessee, a bicycle has the legal status of a vehicle. This means that bicyclists have full rights and responsibilities on the roadway and are subject to the regulations governing the operation of a motor vehicle. Tennessee traffic laws require bicyclists to:

    Ride on the right-hand side of the road with the same direction as traffic
    Obey all traffic signs and signals
    Use hand signals to communicate intended movements.....


    TCA 55-8-175 - Riding on Roadways and Bike Paths – Penalty

    (a) (1) Any person operating a bicycle upon a roadway at less than the normal speed of traffic at the time and place and under the conditions then existing shall ride as close as practicable to the right-hand curb or edge of the roadway, except under any of the following situations:
    (A) When overtaking and passing another vehicle proceeding in the same direction;
    (B) When preparing for a left turn at an intersection or into a private road or driveway; or
    (C) When reasonably necessary to avoid conditions including, but not limited to, fixed or moving objects, parked or moving vehicles, pedestrians, animals, surface hazards, or substandard width lanes that make it unsafe to continue along the right-hand curb or edge. For purposes of this section, "substandard width lane" means a lane that is too narrow for a bicycle and another vehicle to travel safely side by side within the lane.
    (2) This subsection (a) does not apply to a certified police cyclist engaged in the lawful performance of duty relating to traffic control.
    (b)

    (1) Persons riding bicycles upon a roadway shall not ride more than two (2) abreast except on paths or parts of roadways set aside for the exclusive use of bicycles. Persons riding two (2) abreast shall not impede the normal and reasonable movement of traffic and, on a laned roadway, shall ride within a single lane. (2) Subdivision (b)(1) does not apply to a certified police cyclist engaged in the lawful performance of duty relating to traffic control or in pursuit of an actual or suspected violator of the law.
    (c) (1) This subsection (c) shall be known and may be cited as the "Jeff Roth and Brian Brown Bicycle Protection Act of 2007."
    (2) The operator of a motor vehicle, when overtaking and passing a bicycle proceeding in the same direction on the roadway, shall leave a safe distance between the motor vehicle and the bicycle of not less than three feet (3') and shall maintain the clearance until safely past the overtaken bicycle.
    (d) A violation of this section is a Class C misdemeanor.

    https://www.tn.gov/tdot/multimodal-...pedestrian-program/tennesse-bicycle-laws.html
     
    John_V, newleaf150 and rola643 like this.
  7. LarryM

    LarryM Eocyclist

    742
    15
    18
    John_V, newleaf150 and rola643 like this.
  8. Germanrazor

    Germanrazor Member

    26
    50
    13
    I usually ride to the right about 1 foot off the white line. I also dodge pot holes and gravel when feasible with no one eating my rear tire as cagers get very impatient to get “nowhere”.

    Now when I have my turn coming up in about 75 yards I start looking over my left shoulder to see rear approaching cagers and if no issue of them wanting to overtake me I begin to signal left turn so they know my intentions way ahead of time.

    Hopefully this will continue to work.
     
    John_V, MilesR and maelochs like this.