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Total noob (& forum admin)
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Discussion Starter #1
I created this for cbman, so we can help him with his photo skills.

This was a long lens, at around f5.6 or f6.7. Note the background out of focus



This was probably with a 28-80 f2.8, shot wide open



This was with a 50mm and an extension tube, to allow for closer focus. Shot at f1.8.



I don't recall the shutter speed for any of the images, but it was probably close to the lowest I can safely hand-hold and maintain sharpness.
 

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gnar! gnar! gnar!
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179 Posts
Thanks Hack, you're so thoughtful to make a custom photo help thread. I'm using a Canon Rebel T2 that's rockin a 28-90mm lens. As it stands right now I can only go down to an Fstop of 4.5. I'm starting to see the differences aperture size makes. In order to get the greater contrast and definition in a picture that I'm looking for (instead of that washed-out look) I need to adjust aperture according to distance. 4.5 being closest.
 

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Total noob (& forum admin)
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12,350 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
That lens is a bit on the slow side, but you can back away from your subject, zoom in, and shoot at f5.6 (a lens like that doesn't perform so great wide open, so stopping down just a bit improves sharpness) to get that shallow depth of field and nice soft background. That will make your subject pop out a bit more.

Contrast is controlled by several things. First, you need a properly exposed negative. If you have some filters, you can play around with them to control contrast. Red will give you dramatic contrast, and if I recall correctly, green is really good for low contrast foliage shots, and you might try yellow for portraits.

What paper are you using? Graded paper will give you predictable contrast, but it's best for more advanced photographers/printers. A multi-contrast paper allows you to use filters on your enlarger lens to achieve different results, and it's usually cheaper to buy.
 

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gnar! gnar! gnar!
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I normally use Kodak Kodabrome. I did try kodak poly-contrast but I got "holes" in the photo. I'm thinking it's because I'm using film chemistry on paper and it was too strong? I need buy paper chemistry. But the film chem works for now. What does the "F" grade stand for on the paper. I have F to F5. I got all the paper printing supplies from my friend's dad so there's quite the plethora of different paper. I'll try messing with filters (to the camera shop :D )
 

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Total noob (& forum admin)
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12,350 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
The grading of the paper refers to the contrast, with 0 below the lowest - subtle shades of gray, and 5 being the highest - the white of the paper, the blackest the paper can print, and not so much in between.

I'd like to print again, but no one around here appreciates good photography skills.
 
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