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Discussion Starter #1
okay so I just finished cleaning and checking my tires and found some holes in the tires and pieces embedded in them that I removed. is this something I should be concerned of? can I use something like shoegoo to fill the holes? what's the recommended thing to do here? I'm mostly
concerned because I've never owned a bike that has tires rated for above 90psi and I worry what a blowout at 120psi would be like. these tires and rims are both rated for between 100psi-145psi I'm running them at 120psi.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
oh no :( do you think it's okay to ride until this friday (payday)? do I need to be concerned with a tire that runs 120psi (is it dangerous)?
 

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Sneakers recommends Park Tool tire boot. I've used dollar bill, but that is temporary. After a hundred miles, the edge of the folded bill had worn a hole in the inner tube.

A dolar bill will get you through to payday but the Park tire boot should hold a long time. Thinner material, less likely to wear inner tube.

I would have no worries about riding that tire with a boot in it. Keep an eye on it, but I don't think the hole will grow once you've booted it. Yeah I think it could go for a long time. Put it on the back just in case. I've had front flat at 30mph, and it wasn't a problem but rear flat is probably less dangerous.

The worst that can happen is you get a flat tire, and that happens all the time with bicycles anyway.

No ShooGoo!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
cool thanks guys. I'll look into that park tool tire boot tomorrow. I'm thinkin it might not hurt to take the wheel into my LBS and have the take a look too (please don't take that as me not trusting your opinions I do). at first I wasn't sure if I liked the white on the tire but after this I kind of do makes it much easier to inspect. if it comes down to new tires I'll be asking you guys that next. these are vittoria zaffiro's 700x23c. I've seen the continentals online I don't remember the name/series but they are kevlar lined and seemed to have excellent reviews. I just didn't think they had them for clinchers I thought they were tubular only (forgive me if I'm wrong in super new to road bikes). but thanks again for all your help and input! :)
 

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You can use a section from an old inner tube as a sleeve to stop the tube getting pinched by the cut in the tyre. I got a cut in a road tyre that was about 1cm across and I put a sleeve in, inflated to about 60psi and gently rode home. :p
As qmsdc15 mentioned, a cut that size should be fine to ride on for some time to come. :)

You have started well by checking tyres and removing debris which would eventually cause more punctures :thumbsup:

Keep some pieces of thick rubber in your spares kit for just such emergencies. I carry them in my mtb and road spares kits, thankfully I haven't had to use them in a while :thumbsup:

Shane
 

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Yesterday tired old man, Today retired old man
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I think you nead to look at the inside of the tire. if you like put a tire boot inside weather it went all the way thrugh or not. and I use shoogoo to stop outher things from getting in the cut.
 

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With all due respect to MyBikeWorks' extensive experience as a bike mechanic including wrenching for race teams, I suspect booting tires is not done on pro race bikes. :)

The problem with using a piece of inner tube for a boot, is the rubber is stretchy and you want a non-stretchy material to keep the stretchy inner tube from bulging out of the cut. A non-stretchy material will spread the air pressure in the tube across a wider section of outer tire casing. The tire casing is the non-stretchy part of the rubber tire that from keeps the tire from getting bigger when you put air in it. A boot is simply a reinforcement of the casing.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
okay so I picked up the tire boot kit today. and when I got home and took the tire off and inspected the inside of the tire it appears that it did not make it all the way though the tire. should I still boot it anyways to be on the safe side?
 

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I would put a small boot in there, you don't have to use the whole boot at one time.
 

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I would use that tire the way it is. I have had plenty of small holes and tears in tires that size over the years with no issues. The belting in tires is a lot tougher than you think. Try taking a pair of scissors and cutting up an old tire. Its a lot harder than you would imagine. The chances of running over another object in the same location is also rather slight. Whatever worked into your tire if it made its way all the way through would have maybe cut through one strand of 60+ strands per square inch of fiber.

So with that in mind would you boot your tire every time you got a flat?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
thanks everyone. and thanks davereo for the learning lesson I had no idea there were that many strands per square inch. I did already end up booting it but I used half a boot and made sure it was centered on that area. it wasn't a bad idea to pick up the boots anyways just incase now I have 2.5 I can add to my road repair kit. you are all so helpful it's much appreciated thank you everyone :)
 

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Save $s. Use a $

Until this season have not used clinchers since my commuting days back in the '70s. So I'm not sure if this old school trick works with this gen of of clinchers.
The USA 1$ bill works nice as an emergency to depending on needs permanent tire boot.

Side note: Years ago on a training ride a teammate shredded a tire. Beyond the 1$ boot fix. He was running clinchers. I'm running tubulars. Mount my spare tubular onto his clincher rim and rode home.
 

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the $1.00 bill still works (though with "inflation" i reccommend a $5.00) as i used it last year after a 3 flat ride.
 

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If the hole penetrated the underlying casing then there may be cause for concern but odds are it was just a piece of junk that got embedded in the rubber. A tiny bit of shoe goo will fill that little spot just fine. If you roll perfectly over a piece of glass right on that spot you might have a greater chance of a flat but I would not be concerned for day to day riding, although I might rotate that to my rear wheel. Iif you're running these at 120 they are 23mm, eh? When you do replace the tire, consider a 25mm tire. If the tire's casing is penetrated and cut beneath the hole I would then toss the tire, but even that might be overkill, depending on your budget and how cautious you are. A good tyvek boot would keep the tube safe and some shoegoo would fill the gap.
 

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That tire is repairable. The Park tire boot works great, I cut the patches in fourth and use them for the small holes. And Shoe Goo works great from the outside. What you do is first buff the inside of the tire with some sand paper, wipe it real clean with a alcohol soaked pad, apply the patch. Install tire and tube onto rim and inflate to normal psi. Then take the Shoe Goo fill in the hole using a toothpick, cover with duct tape, and let it set for 24 hours, then peel of duct tape and go riding.
 
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