Tools for the Ride

Discussion in 'Beginners Forum' started by BobH, Nov 21, 2010.

  1. BobH

    BobH New Member

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    Hi Folks,

    I live in a rural area. Most of my riding is within 7 miles of home. I know the day is coming when I will have a flat tire or some other failure. My question is "What should my basic bike tool kit include?" Do any of you have favorites tools and brands that you could recommend?

    Thanks in advance,
    BobH
     
  2. rola643

    rola643 Two skinny Js Staff Member Admin Staff Mod Team Tavern Member

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    First tool I pack...a cell phone ! Then Road ID® USA's #1 Source for Runners ID, Cycling ID & Medical ID Tags If I am going much more than 50 miles I carry a credit card just for peace of mind.

    Obviously a tube, at least 2 tire levers, and I prefer CO2, small fast and convenient. If you choose CO2 you should deflate the tire when you get home and remove all the CO2 you can and refill with your favorite pump. I would also carry a multi-tool.

    Park Tool Co.- Rescue Tool for example and CO2 Bike Pump Reviews should you decide to go that route. You may also wan to look at something like one of these to carry it all in Topeak® Cycling Accessories

    I don't personally carry anything more than that and not always a multi-tool cuz it's pretty heavy :D

    Just my .02 worth, opinions many vary :rolleyes: Hope it helps.
    ^^^
    *may*
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2010

  3. LarryM

    LarryM Eocyclist

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    Like rola, I always carry a cell phone, ID, and insurance card.

    I think the minimun tool set for any trip that's farther from home than you care to walk back consists of tire levers, a spare tube and a patch kit in case there is a 2nd flat, and some kind of inflator. I prefer a pump to a CO2 inflator because I never have to worry about running out of CO2 charges. I have a Topeak Mountain Morph and my wife has a Topeak Road Morph.

    For me, a typical ride will range 15 to 20 miles from home. And my wife and I take fairly rides way out in the sticks or away from home for several days or weeks in a row. In addition to the minimum tire change stuff, on longer trips I always carry:
    • a set of 6 allen keys
    • a small Leatherman with needle nose pliers, standard and Phillips screw drivers, a can opener, scissors, and a knife blade.
    • a 10mm open end /box end wrench ( needed for the center pull cantilever brakes on both of our bikes )
    • a spoke wrench
    • a chain tool
    • a few zip ties

    A good general rule, however, is to never carry anything you don't kow how to use.
     
  4. stdu007

    stdu007 New Member

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    a co2 pump, a tube, tire lever, a chain tool, spoke wrench, an alen key set, few buck (5$)
     
  5. froze

    froze Banned

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    Keep the spare tube in it's box so nothing in the bag will poke a hole into it.

    A pump, there are several good ones on the market, don't get a real small mini because they will only pump to about 65psi, no matter what the manufacture claims are, and it will take about 500 strokes! Get a mid size mini like the Topeak Road Morph, most LBS's carry those; or SKS Raceday Carbon that I have; or the Lezyne Pressure Drive M; either of those 3 pumps represent the best on the market for their size and all about the same price. CO2's are fast but you have a limited supply of air, I have no use for them.

    A mini tool like the Park MTB3 that I have, or Topeak Mini 20. These tools have built in spoke wrenches, chain tool, allen keys, 10mm open end wrench, blade and phillip screw drivers plus others. That eliminates carrying around a bunch of separate tools. I bought a cheap Target brand small leatherman that has scissors, a knife, can opener, needle nose pliers.

    Zip ties could be useful.

    Duct tape is useful but you only need a 2-3 of feet and wrap it around the tube box but not so that you can't get the box open.

    I carry $50 in cash just in case, along with state ID, insurance ID, and a small first aid kit. I also carry 2 alcohol pads to clean the tube to prepare for patching after buffing; and 4 GOJO pads for cleaning hands.

    I also take a ultralight tightly folded racing tire in case I blow a tire.

    Like Cycles, I find my self wondering 50 or more miles from home on a Saturday in areas that are remote. Once you start riding further you will come to realize just how valuable carrying this stuff can be, or perhaps helping a stranded rider. All the stuff I outlined, except for the pump, fit in a expandable wedge seat bag.
     
  6. BobH

    BobH New Member

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    Folks,

    Thank you for the info. I think I'm up for the Park MTB3 and a Leatherman type tool. I want to pet some tire pumps /CO2 inflators before I decide. I had not considered a spare tire, I believe that Wifey's Haro Heartland and my Giant Sedona can share a spare. The currency, insurance cards, and IDs are great ideas. Do I need to carry a spare set of brake pads? Typically, my billfold is not with me.

    My wife is equipped with (2) cell phones. So far, I have not needed a cell phone to talk to myself. (grin)

    I want to keep the kit simple, and I want to get it right the first time. Any more thoughts on the tool kit?

    BobH
     
  7. LarryM

    LarryM Eocyclist

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    A tube can get pin holes worn in it after rattling around in the box for a couple thousand miles. It's happened to me once, and I've seen it happen to others.

    I always remove the tube from the box and put it in a Hefty Zip-Lock bag along with some talcum powder. The talc helps to seat the tube in the tire properly, and the sock serves as a rag, or I can put my hand in the sockwhenever I have to handle the chain.
     
  8. LarryM

    LarryM Eocyclist

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    I just noticed that none of us mentioned carrying something to boot the tire.

    If the thing that caused the flat cuts a slit in the tire, the inflated tube could herniate thru the slit. You can "boot" tire by placing a dollar bill, power bar wrapper, or a piece of an old tube inside the tire covering the slit. I always have a power bar or old power bar wrapper in my bar bag.
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2010
  9. gs46

    gs46 Pedaling Old Man

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    I just carry a cell phone and a map, sometimes my wallet. I call AAA road service (my wife) for help.
     
  10. whyeyebike

    whyeyebike New Member

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    1 tube, 1 compact patch kit, tire levers, CO2 auto injector with 1 extra cartridge, and a small bag to put it in under my seat. Keep my cell phone and keys with an ID pouch (holds my driver license, debit card and cash) in my back jersey pocket. And I never ride without my RoadID.
     
  11. rawhite1969

    rawhite1969 Back in the Saddle

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    spare tube, small multi tool, CliffBar, first aid kit, cell phone, number for the local cab company for ride home :)

    Have only had one flat that disabled my ride in 2500 miles this year (lucky I guess). I do run the slime tubes and kevlar lined tires. Had two other flats that sealed themselves and fixed them at home. I figure the weight of the tubes/tires is worth the lack of hassle.
     
  12. wild

    wild Yesterday tired old man, Today retired old man

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    frame mount pump

    in my under seat bag
    1 patch kit
    1 tire boot patch
    2 wipes
    1 pair ruber gloves
    3 tire levers
    2 tubes
    1-2 pack fig newtons
    3 wire ties
    1 small pick to pick out glass
    1 Quicklink
    1 multi tool
    1 cel phone
    1 house key

    around my neck
    ID
    $20
    I know there is things I forgotton
     
  13. jeepster93

    jeepster93 New Member

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    I paid premium for an ultra light bicycle. I carry very little with me.
    On purpose.

    I carry on the bike:
    All in a small expandable under seat wedge pack:
    1 spare tube
    a tire patch kit, in case I need more than one flat fixed
    2 CO2 cartridges and the pump thing
    a very small multi bike tool
    a small container of sunscreen, as I am susceptible to "skin spots"
    Water bottle(s)
    Snacks if needed

    On me:
    In the rear pockets:
    a road ID
    $5
    cell phone
     
  14. photosbymark

    photosbymark New Member

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    Im just the opposite. I have a steel Sun ray and carry lots of tools. Bolt on wheels means you need a wrench, and I just added a cheap $5 set in the bag. Pliers are on a regular multi tool I usually have and a bike multi tool. Spare tubes, boots, air, lubes, and always have a few extra gels and bars stuck in a bag. If I am really going a long way, I will sometimes throw the small spin doctor set in the bag. Yes its a weight penalty but I am in no hurry, and when the breakdown finally happens I can usually find a way to fix it. It's just me but I hate to walk bikes home.
     
  15. BobH

    BobH New Member

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    Hi folks,

    You are giving me many ideas. Many of the things mentioned, I had not thought of. (lack of personnal experience) I've ordered a pump and a multi-tool for my LBS. When the tools come in I'll purchase (2) tubes and boots. I'm sure that I will add other things. I want to carry the stuff in an under seat bag.

    Wonder if there is a bag that will mount to my Giant Sedona's seat? I don't see any tabs on it, and the springs are encased.

    Bob Haverstock
     
  16. froze

    froze Banned

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    You don't need a seat with tabs, just rails which all seats have. Most bags come with two straps that are connected together at the top of the bag near the center so they appear to be one strap (which technically they are), one strap goes over the top of one rail and the other over the top of the opposite rail, then they come down over the bag along the sides and are fastened underneath the bag. Then there's another either velcro strap or a clip that goes around the seat post and connects the nose of the bag.

    If you want, buy a expandable wedge bag, this will be a larger bag then smaller lighter bag but if you start riding long distances and need to carry more stuff the larger bag will will handle it without having to buy another. Since it's expandable you can keep the expandable part closed and it will look smaller. A lot of minimalist riders frown on the larger seat bags but then if their lucky a rider like me comes by and helps them because they couldn't carry the tools, otherwise their walking or calling their mommies...er I mean wife.

    Do yourself a huge favor. If your not real good a changing tubes or fixing flats on the road then practice at home on the rear (because of the complication of the rear derailleur) taking the wheel off the bike, removing the tire and tube then put it all back on again. Last thing you want to happen is have a flat and attempt to learn how to fix it on the road.

    Don't forget to refer to You Tube for visual step by step instructions on how to repair a bike flat.

    Patching is easy if the preparation is done correctly. My earlier post I mention I carry a spare tube, but I always first attempt to fix the flatted tube first. Before removing the tire I find the hole either by inspection or pumping air into the tire and listen for the air, then mark the spot on the tire so I can find the hole when I take the tube out. If that fails I remove the tube and put air into it till I hear the air leaking. 99% of the time I can find a hole fast, if not I go to the spare and take the tube home for a baptism. Then I buff an area where the hole is larger then the patch. Next take an alcohol pad and clean the area in which I just buffed especially do this if there was talcum on the tube when it originally went in. Then I use Park Clueless patches so I don't have to bother with glue and it holds just as well, peel off the patch holding it by just an edge of one corner so as not to dirty up too large an area, and place it over the hole (do not try remove the patch once you lay it down, make sure it's centered over the hole) then press the patch very firmly for 30 seconds. I press the two opposite corners first for 30 secs then go to the other corners and press for 30 secs just to make sure the entire surface of the patch go pressed.

    Also don't forget to check the inside of the tire for the object that caused the flat and pull it out of the tire. I usually pull it out before I remove the tire off the rim, but if you can't find it then you'll have to run your hand around the inside of the tire where the hole in the tube was to try to find it. If you don't find it the object could reflat your fixed or new tube as soon as you put air into it. Can you say frustration?

    Also if the tire has a larger hole then a pin prick I also cut a small piece of a Park Tire Boot and patch the hole in the tire for added safety. Then to go a bit further I apply some SuperGlue to the cut from the outside to fill in the cut. By they way I use the SuperGlue BEFORE I start patching to give it time to dry, or I wait till I get home and glue it.
     
  17. gs46

    gs46 Pedaling Old Man

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    A lot of minimalist riders frown on the larger seat bags but then if their lucky a rider like me comes by and helps them because they couldn't carry the tools, otherwise their walking or calling their mommies...er I mean wife.


    Uncalled for....
     
  18. Industry_Hack

    Industry_Hack Total noob (& forum admin) Admin Staff Tavern Member

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    Tube, patch kit, pump, a little folding multi-tool, wallet and cell phone. Sometimes a Desert Eagle .50AE if I'm in bear company.

    Ok, maybe not that last item.
     
  19. speedfan

    speedfan speedfan

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    Tools

    I carry a "wallet", it has levers, co2, patches. I also carry a spare tube and cell phone. I also have used the AAA service, my wife has rescued me several times.
     
  20. rola643

    rola643 Two skinny Js Staff Member Admin Staff Mod Team Tavern Member

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    If I could get away with a nice holster like this, I'm down with the Eagle at my side :D
     

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