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Discussion Starter #1
I'm planning on a trip to Colorado next year and I've got the notion that I want to ride up a few mountains instead of just down them. The trouble is that the longest hills here are maybe a quarter mile, not near as steep as a mountain, and you have a nice and thick atmosphere. Any pointers for training or am I stuck with riding up a hill, going down, and riding up again ad nauseam?
 

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Drink plenty of water!!!
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Great idea with the indoor trainer. Also spinning if you're into that, stair trainer. During the winter weight train for leg/abdominal strength plus distance wind training (running). Don't forget what goes up must come down and descending mountains can be quite scary if you haven't done it before.
 

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Drink plenty of water!!!
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here's a youtube clip about mtn descending. See if you can watch it without your palms getting sweaty!!
[ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=prizVtOydcw&feature=related]YouTube - Kühtai 2007 - look 595 vs caad8 highspeed 104 km/h[/ame]
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Any certain workouts with the indoor trainer or just intervals of getting your heart rate up to 80 or 90%?
 

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Drink plenty of water!!!
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Get it up and keep it up. The climbs will involve prolonged 20-40 minute periods of nonstop 90% (or more) of maxpulse.
 

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as a flatlander (Florida) ---my answer to your question is SADDLE TIME...lots of it.

Get a really good base then progress to intervals and also periods of sustained tempo (like 3/5/10/15 minutes at 80% of your max effort.

then also make sure you have enough gears (i mean low gearing) to be comfortable.

I have ridden over the cascades - rockies -- tetons --adirondaks-- green mountains and white mountains ....and this works

the altitude will not be as big a problem as you think... at least not at 10,000 much above that HURTS....but you can just slow down

I have found many of the mountains out west with their long gradual 7-8% grades are not near as tiring as the shorter steeper relentless in number of them in vermont or say virginia/ tennessee

good luck... and if it gets bad---- that means it must be pretty ---stop and take a picture (grin)
 

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If you're talking about climbing Vail pass or Monarch or the like...

There is really no way to adjust to the altitude without time.

From the coast to Vail pass is 3 miles(or so-12,000 feet) in altitude increase.
There is only one way to adjust...TIME.

You would need to fly into Denver...spend at least 24 hours.
Go to vail( at 9300 feet) spend at least a day or better 2, sleep at that altitude.

Then ride away!!!

If you are in good enough condition to ride the pass, this will not change, just the speed at which you do it.
 
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