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Discussion Starter #1
Today I posted a follow-up review of the Wabi Lightning single-speed/fixed-gear bike on my blog. You can see it here: Wabi Lightning Riding Review

The Lighting is the 2nd Wabi bicycle that I have reviewed, the first being the Wabi Classic. Both are great bikes. The Classic is about 18 pounds and has the plush ride of steel, while the Lightning is about 15 pounds, and has a nice ride (but not quite as plush as steel). Anyone considering a higher-end fixed-gear or single-speed bike should consider Wabi -- they really make quality bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Is this your comutter bike?
No, unfortunately I work too far from home and too long of hours to be a regular bike commuter (if I was, I'd never have any family time). That's why I often ride at night during the week, after the kids go to bed.
 

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No, unfortunately I work too far from home and too long of hours to be a regular bike commuter (if I was, I'd never have any family time). That's why I often ride at night during the week, after the kids go to bed.
I hear that. My "commuter bike" is a Harley Davidson. I went from hard core MTB riding and BMX racing to slower paced family rides after dinner, and the occasional ride after work or on weekends.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The Classic is a great bike, and has a great ride due to being steel. The Lightning has a good ride, but not as plush as the Classic -- guess that's the trade-off for the Lightning weighing 3 pounds less. For someone like me (a Clydesdale, not super-sensitive to bike weight), I'd probably opt for the Classic.

For those obsessed with lugged bikes, I'm sure the Wabi Special has the same great steel ride as the Classic. Perhaps I'm strange, but I'm just fine seeing the welds.
 

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I was wondering if you were a cyclist.
Ouch. When I lived in SoCal, I pretty much rode every day. In Australia, I commuted to work at a transport company and a bike shop by MTB and BMX, respectively. I also raced BMX over there. But when I moved to Utah, which, at 6,000+ feet, has a climate dramatically different than what I was accustomed to, I started having difficulties breathing. The air is thinner, and has very little humidity, which has wreaked havoc on my allergies. I've had two surgeries just so I can breathe. So my pace has changed just a bit, but I still enjoy riding.
 

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Maybe you should move back to sea level. Let me know if you'd like to change places with DC's second hardest working freight biker. :)
 

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Maybe you should move back to sea level. Let me know if you'd like to change places with DC's second hardest working freight biker. :)
I'm sort of trapped in Utah right now, hoping that I can one day acclimate, rather than rely on meds for really bad days.

Ironically, one of my goals was to design and build my own line of cargo bikes and trailers. But I bought a house with no garage, and my ex pretty much drained my bank account of the necessary funds.
 
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