Walmart E-Zip Trailz Hybrid Electric Bicycle 2008

Discussion in 'General Bike Discussion' started by 47Steve, Oct 22, 2009.

  1. Industry_Hack

    Industry_Hack Total noob (& forum admin) Admin Staff Tavern Member

    12,349
    651
    113
    It's like someone said "how can we make a crappy bike crappier?", and WalMart answered. Seriously. It has a shipping weight of 81lbs. So maybe it weighs 50lbs? What does that leave you with? An overweight, junky hybrid, or a low-performance electric scooter. It seems to me that the electric assist would be needed just to be able to get it moving.
     

  2. ghostrider

    ghostrider Guest

    5
    0
    0
    Hey you can "Add a second battery (sold separately) for added range"... I wonder how fast the first one wears out... knowing cheap companies and cheap batteries
     
  3. funetical

    funetical Slowin it up.

    4,299
    0
    0
    That would probably be good for people trying to figure out if they need an electric assist.
     
  4. Industry_Hack

    Industry_Hack Total noob (& forum admin) Admin Staff Tavern Member

    12,349
    651
    113
    How about one of those gas pipe trikes, but with dual car batteries, and a starter motor?
     
  5. tankboy

    tankboy Guest

    13
    0
    0
    I'm suprised they don't snap the battery into a hollowed out portion of the main frame tubing instead of having it hanging in some weird detachable way

    Do these have any security if you need to go in somewhere?
     
  6. Industry_Hack

    Industry_Hack Total noob (& forum admin) Admin Staff Tavern Member

    12,349
    651
    113
    Yes, it's from WalMart.
     
  7. buckrogers007

    buckrogers007 New Member

    11
    0
    0
    gas motor still cheaper and better (for now)

    ...I really like 2-stroke motors still. Way cheaper and the ones I buy are rated at 10K miles before rebuild (if you take care of it) and the rebuild kit is 30 bucks..mainly gaskets. And a BIG plus where I live, the cars can hear me on the 2-stroke and they look my way.

    That's my reasoning for the gas motor over electric right now.
    $2.66 for 91 grade gas and get 130-150mpg ...yes, per gallon. to me, not bad.

    And you can do a sweet build for around 600 with new frame/top line tires...
     
  8. SteveM21

    SteveM21 Guest

    1
    0
    0
    Hate to rain on the parade here, but I have had one of these for 2 years now and had zero problems w/ it. Bought it online from Walmart for around $350 back then, spent another $100 for another battery, did the usual changing out of the seat and handlebars, and it's been bulletproof. I use it to haul groceries from the store in a kiddie trailer or when it's windy and I'm feeling lazy. The batteries are supposed to last one year but mine still hold a charge, although the range is about half what they were the first year. Yep. it's heavy. It's those lead acid batteries, but they're cheap and dependable. The drive setup is Currie Pro Drive, a company that was started right here in the US, and it's the best electric drive setup you can buy. Very smooth w/ only a little whine. Powerful 450 watt motor w/ chain drive. You can get just the motorized kit for $300, but why not just get the whole bike for not much more? It's pretty much put together. Takes about an hour or so to assemble. Sure, it's bottom priced. You can pay 2, 3, 10 times more. But you won't get much of a better bike. All electric bikes are heavy unless you go to a $600 lithium ion battery, but who cares? The motor pulls you along. W/ two batteries you'll get over 20 miles.

    I briefly tried a gas engine setup w/ a Honda GX35 engine and Staton friction drive. Didn't like the noise, the vibration, or much else. The electric bike flies under the radar. Most people aren't even aware it's a powered bike. And the torque is instant, unlike the gas engines that need a centrifugal clutch that keeps the engine wound up and loud. W/ an electric you just twist the throttle and go. The electric hub motors are quieter, but they can't pull hills very well.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2009
  9. buckrogers007

    buckrogers007 New Member

    11
    0
    0
    Nice

    ...seems cool for that 350 price! I still love the feel of the gas motor and the sound for cars in Boulder CO..a lot of young students who don't pay much attention unless they hear a motor out their window. I build mine with raditor hose rubber in certain places to dampen noise. But honestly, nonone else I have asked around me with motor running that is is loud...they say normal or 'I don't have to raise my voice to talk so fine'.


    I am sure in the future the electric and hydrogen will get better and cheaper!

    For my specific uses, gas is still it and cheap.

    Peace:)
     
  10. 47Steve

    47Steve New Member

    30
    0
    0
    I've gone the moped route, because I love 2-cycle engines. Plus, you get a total package designed for powered transportation -- frame, suspension, brakes, drive components, all made to work together and more durable.

    Check out a Tomos Sprint (about $1000)
     
  11. buckrogers007

    buckrogers007 New Member

    11
    0
    0
    Tomos Mopeds..

    ..I just checked those out. They are nice mopeds. This website had more details on the mopeds than official site does:
    Tomos Mopeds

    49cc is nice so no license or insurance. The parts were around $200+.
    The basic is the Sprint for $1000 the sweet next model up was $1300 then to $1600+.

    I like that 'if' you already have an old cruiser frame laying around, and get a good 48-50cc kit and a few upgraded parts and you may pay around $400 for a nice ride that you can pedal when want to or let out clutch and go.
    Also, I do enjoy tinkering with my hands and building things probably helps my liking of motorbikes.

    Peace!
     
  12. motorizedfun

    motorizedfun New Member

    2
    0
    0
    Industry Hack and you others that posted so much negativity about the Ezip, do any of you own one? Sadly, I'll have to rain on your parade as SteveM21 did. I've owned one for almost 2 years and drive it daily year round. I live in a very small town and we have paved streets that have been patched so much, they are a solid mass of patches. We have many dirt, sometimes muddy washboard roads and railroad track crossings that haven't been maintained in 30 years. We have plenty of moderate hills. I paid $150 brand new on clearance at Wal-Mart and it's a 2008 model. I bought it in the store, so I had no concerns with "shipping weight". As Steve said, it's heavy because this is the nature of SLA batteries. Sure, I could buy a lithium battery pack for $600 if I had the money, which I don't, but with battery technology still being in the stone ages, those expensive batteries have a threshold where, if they are discharged too much, they can be irreversibly damaged. I've heard many stories where the pack just quit working. And with the sellers we have to deal with, it's very unlikely any so-called warranty would be honored, especially if you bought it directly from China, as is the case with most ebay sellers I've seen that sell them. SLA batteries, while bulky and cumbersome, are still the tried and true and cheap power that we can depend on at least for now. My Ezip has never ever failed me getting to and from my destination. Not one nut or bolt has ever come loose. Not one spoke has ever come loose. I've never seen a hill I couldn't climb. I've never been given a second look by a cop and I've never had a problem parking it. I know that the low price tag has a psychological impact on some. I've seen ebikes that cost over $1000 that had no better range or dependability than this bike. But of course, anything sold by Wal-Mart couldn't possibly be any good.
     
  13. 47Steve

    47Steve New Member

    30
    0
    0
    I think electric bikes will have a future. As with all things electric, it mostly depends on the battery technology. Look how much power you can get out of a battery-powered electric drill -- that amazes me.
     
  14. motorizedfun

    motorizedfun New Member

    2
    0
    0
    All electric vehicles have a future and yes, it all depends on battery technology. That new miracle battery is always "just around the corner" is what I've been hearing for many years. Until it happens, I just use what's available and reasonably priced. Some people do wire several drill batteries in series for ebikes. But I've never owned a Black and Decker or other drill battery that didn't poop out within 6 months, whether I left them on the charger or off.
     
  15. Industry_Hack

    Industry_Hack Total noob (& forum admin) Admin Staff Tavern Member

    12,349
    651
    113
    I've never wished for a motor on my bicycle. When I want more power than I can apply myself, I will ride a motorcycle.
     
  16. lowbeauxxx

    lowbeauxxx New Member

    2
    0
    0
    I've seen a guy with one around here where I live. On flat land he was moving at a rate of about 20-25 miles per hour. I'm sure inclines are his bane. I've had experience with electric motors. To me they are overpriced and underpowered, but that guy that I saw was the envy of bicyclists around here. Hee, hee!:p
     
  17. Industry_Hack

    Industry_Hack Total noob (& forum admin) Admin Staff Tavern Member

    12,349
    651
    113
    When I worked at a bike shop in Australia, a lady came in very red and covered in perspiration. She had just pushed her rather heavy "electric bike" to the bike shop, as it had a flat tire. (Or tyre ;)) The worst part was that she was refused service. Granted, it wasn't a simple bike with a motor bolted on, but that was a sad lesson for her.
     
  18. Will

    Will Guest

    2
    0
    0
    Izip bike

    Steve, who lives in New Mexico bought one of these bikes two years ago. He owns no car and this is his main transportation. He tells me that he has had "0" problems. After two years the batteries seem to be getting weaker so he does not have the range as when they were new. I think he said his range was 10 miles at 15 mph.