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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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Cool find! I'm intrigued by the Canadians' rifle mount: as pictured in the linked article, it seems like it would inhibit steering without some sort of swivel. That in turn would seem to introduce needless complexity relative to other solutions, which generally had a front attachment point on the head tube rather than the top of the bars. I wonder what was gained by the methodology chosen. Judging by the pics, I imagine the mounted rifle wouldn't leave much clearance for the cyclist's right leg. At the same time, the system presumably worked well enough to be taken overseas and into active combat. I hope it had countervailing strengths which aren't evident from the pics. Either way, an interesting read. I'm fascinated by bicycles in general, but especially so when it comes to their historical military uses. Thanks for the post!
 

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The rifle mounts puzzled me too, must be more to it than it shows as it seems impractical and awkward.

Bicycling Mag had a story a few years ago about a guy who hunts with his fat bike.

I'm always fascinated by interesting use of bikes.

I've wanted to write an end-of-the-world story where the protagonist uses a bike for transport and carrying supplies and items for survival through all kinds of terrain. Sorry, kinda off-topic.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
Joined
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5,487 Posts
The rifle mounts puzzled me too, must be more to it than it shows as it seems impractical and awkward.

Bicycling Mag had a story a few years ago about a guy who hunts with his fat bike.

I'm always fascinated by interesting use of bikes.

I've wanted to write an end-of-the-world story where the protagonist uses a bike for transport and carrying supplies and items for survival through all kinds of terrain. Sorry, kinda off-topic.
Though it didn't reveal much in the way of specific functionality, I was impressed by how quickly the troops depicted in the linked article's YouTube video were able to remove their rifles from their odd bike mounts. Their formation cycling was also impressive and fun to watch. It's basically the same as marching in formation, but the use of bikes brings a speed and fluidity which marching based movement simply can't touch.

At the risk of topic drift, hunting by bike is actually a thing, and the rise of e-bikes seems to be fueling it although it remains largely unknown. I have read accounts of people using MTBs, though fat bikes appear to be ideal. There are some modern rifle and bow mounting hardware, though I think historic military solutions are better in functional terms.

In addition to getting hunters into the back country ahead of the hiking competition, bikes have been used to transport field dressed deer and even elk out of the back country with the hunter pushing the game laden bike. Seems vastly preferable to solutions based on dragging. Perhaps another thread is warranted; I've done a fair amount of research on hunting by bike, along with practicing the corollary fishing by bike. Given the proper circumstances, the latter offers some definite advantages.

As you may have noticed, I share your interest in unusual uses for bikes.

On that notes, I'd love to see an end of the world story involving bikes! I am a long time fan of post-apocalypse type fiction, but generally found it jarring and unbelievable that automotive transport was nearly always a part of the story despite the manifest problems associated with the obtainment and storage of gasoline and other fossil fuels in such a world. Bikes seem to make more sense, though I can't think of any such stories featuring them.

To return to the subject, I am interested in learning more about the 'Hundred Days Campaign' at the end of WWI when the Canadian Cyclist Corps was able to exhibit its tactical mobility. I've found some information on military cycling by various nations circa WWII, but very little on their use in combat. It seems that troops mounted on bikes offer advantages over those on foot or utilizing traditional mechanized solutions such as troop carriers. I'm interested to see how things worked out on the ground in a shooting war.
 
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