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Do you have the CM5.2; Cyclone Scrubber chain cleaning tool? I am looking at them on Amazon and that appears to the only one with the magnet, yes?
Yes, that is the one.

You can use any chain cleaning solution or solvent you want, you don't have to buy the Park brand. Also this scrubber, machine, whatever, most LBS's sell the replacement parts, the brushes etc do wear out over time so you just buy the rebuild kit.
 

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The melting temperature (120-140 oF) and the hardness of paraffin is low. It would not be able to stand on the chain for a long ride, especially in summer. High melting temp, non crystalline wax-based lub could do the job. As a chemist, I don't like fluoro products. It's not about harming our body. It's about protecting a better environment for our next ride~
 

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The melting temperature (120-140 oF) and the hardness of paraffin is low. It would not be able to stand on the chain for a long ride, especially in summer. High melting temp, non crystalline wax-based lub could do the job. As a chemist, I don't like fluoro products. It's not about harming our body. It's about protecting a better environment for our next ride~
Doesn't the manufacturing of Carbon fiber use Fluoro products?

As far as wax lubes go, their not worth my spit to put on a chain. I've used wax based lubes a couple of times over the last 40 plus years and paraffin wax melted by itself and melted with Slick 50 in it still never lasted more than 70 miles by itself and about 120 with the Slick 50. So I gave up on doing that lengthy and messy method. Then later they came out with drip on wax so I tried several brands of that stuff, and it was worse than the paraffin block wax. I don't know about the temp stuff, I did live in California and rode in high heat but even in cooler times the wax still didn't last, I found myself carrying a small bottle of wax lube when I tried the liquid wax so I could reapply it about 70 miles into a ride!
 

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Decades ago I also tried waxing, but found it to have high resistance and low lubrication. The gears and chain wore out faster than with any other chain lube.

I used to use Phil's Tenacious oil, but have recently switched to Purple Extreme synthetic. My LBS said it was good stuff, but I don't have enough miles on the chain/gears to voice an opinion at this time.
 

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Decades ago I also tried waxing, but found it to have high resistance and low lubrication. The gears and chain wore out faster than with any other chain lube.

I used to use Phil's Tenacious oil, but have recently switched to Purple Extreme synthetic. My LBS said it was good stuff, but I don't have enough miles on the chain/gears to voice an opinion at this time.
Good point I failed to bring up. My chains lasted about an average of 5,000 miles on any wax product I tried, and this was back in the day of the wider chains that lasted a lot longer then the thin jewelry chains of today. Whenever I switched off of wax and tried any other lube, not just one or two other brands, any brand of non wax based lube, my chains lives went up to an average of 13,000 miles. That's almost a 3 times longer life expectancy over wax lubes!
 

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Good point I failed to bring up. My chains lasted about an average of 5,000 miles on any wax product I tried, and this was back in the day of the wider chains that lasted a lot longer then the thin jewelry chains of today. Whenever I switched off of wax and tried any other lube, not just one or two other brands, any brand of non wax based lube, my chains lives went up to an average of 13,000 miles. That's almost a 3 times longer life expectancy over wax lubes!
Very interesting point. Do you keep the old waxed chain ? It might be something interesting (to me at least) to know what happened to the wax and the chain .:cool:
 

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Very interesting point. Do you keep the old waxed chain ? It might be something interesting (to me at least) to know what happened to the wax and the chain .:cool:
I never had any reason nor wanted to keep any of my old chains, and my wife is such that she would had made sure I didn't anyways!
 

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For those interested in wax chains, please see waxmaxcycle.com ... Useful if you don't want to do it yourself, but if you do ... See the how-to section.


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For those interested in wax chains, please see waxmaxcycle.com ... Useful if you don't want to do it yourself, but if you do ... See the how-to section.


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Maybe someone might like this but why? for the cost of a chain wax you can get a new chain! And wax does NOT extend the chains life, I use to wax my chains all the time and can tell you that the longest lasting chains happened when I used teflon based lube by about at least 3 to 1 wax chain. And if you want to wax then buy the wax at walmart for around $3 for a 16 ounce block and get on the internet and figure out how to do it, it's not rocket science just a bit time consuming and messy. In fact I think the home version is better than this Waxcycle because it goes on thicker which means it will last longer because all wax will shed and if you can't see the wax like you can't at Waxcycle that wax won't last more than 500 miles and I'm being very generous in that figure. Keep in mind too that wax does not prevent the chain from rusting either.
 

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500 miles would be optimistic ... Chain wax lasts about 250 miles safely in dry conditions. The benefits are having a clean chain all the time and in having less friction. In my experience waxed chains do last a lot longer than oiled chains which is logical since less friction equals less wear. Friction-facts.com have a very good research paper to support this.


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I have never waxed my chains before and have had excellent luck with dry Teflon lube. So my question is, "How does waxing a chain prevent it from stretching?", which is why you change a chain in the first place.


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Stretching is a slight misnomer ... The pivot pins wear and the chain gets longer through movement. Waxing reduces the friction so the chain doesn't wear as fast. Friction-facts compared about 30 bike lubes and paraffin wax outperformed them all in terms of least friction. I think the velonews article is still available on the friction-facts website and makes for some interesting reading. The second best lube was Rock n' roll. The worst performing lube had a loss of nearly 6 watts over paraffin wax.


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My experiences and those I use to race with would dispute the claims of longer lasting chains using wax, but I don't want to wax on to long on this because it will cause a stir. I would agree that with less friction comes less wear but for some reason that didn't work with chains. And if all that is true then why aren't the pros all about waxing their chains? And there is already disputes about that test you quoted, read this: http://velonews.competitor.com/2013...aq-more-on-lubricating-chains-with-wax_279148

When I use to wax my chains the wax would last about 150 miles which is about twice as long as the wax crap in a bottle.

But dispite all the above you still have to deal with the thought of paying someone $25 every, say 250 miles, to have a chain waxed? Where I come from that would be called insanity. It would be cheaper to run the factory original lube till it wore off and just buy another chain. Which leads us right back to my first post and just buy the wax from Walmart and do it yourself. If you do it yourself buy a cheap crock pot and never use it for cooking food once you use it for waxing chains. Let the crock pot melt the wax which takes about 30 minutes, then put chain into the crock pot allowing the molten wax to completely cover the chain and cook it for 20 minutes or when it stops to bubble whichever is longer. Remove the chain with a coat hanger by hooking the chain, then hang the chain to allow it to cool. Reinstall the chain and go; I never wiped off the excess because it will flake off on it's own. A crock pot is a lot safer method then putting a pot on the stove and heating up the wax that way.

In that website I gave one poster mentioned he mixed in graphite from the hardware store, I've never tried that but it seems logical, he claims 25,000 km on chains and gears. Some of you experiment with homemade oil brew maybe someone can experiment with wax and graphite. Toward the end of my waxing days I did put in a couple of ounces of Slick 50, the original Slick 50 used Dupont teflon, for some reason the modern Slick 50 uses a lesser grade of teflon not from Dupont.

Even IF waxing does turn out to be the better way I won't be going back to that, it's messy and time consuming, it will take at least an hour and 1/2 to remove the chain off the bike, let it bake in the wax, cool the chain, and reinstall it. Assuming that VeloNews report was accurate then I would rather use Rock N Roll Gold, no removing of chain, just clean, apply, and go. Of course one could have several sets of chains, you can wax more than one chain in that crock pot either together all at once or separately, then when it's time to rewax simply put on a chain that was waxed before and rewax the old one.

Be interesting to see if the pros go back to the art of waxing chains.
 

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It would be interesting to see the pro's do anything but ride. ;)

Waxing is more labor intensive. For that reason alone I will continue to apply liquid lube out of a squirt bottle.
 

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It would be interesting to see the pro's do anything but ride. ;)

Waxing is more labor intensive. For that reason alone I will continue to apply liquid lube out of a squirt bottle.
I'd be surprised if they even lube the chain since they get almost everything for free from sponsors, so they probably just get boxes of new chains and put the chain manufacturer's name on their jerseys. Even if they don't get free chains of course the riders won't be lubing or waxing their chains, their mechanics are responsible for that.

Speaking of friction, there was some brands of motor oil years ago that use to use wax in their oil because it reduced friction, problem was it shortened the life of engines! Bleach also reduces friction, so an oil additive company employed bleach in their additive and sold it as a miracle friction reducer, except it corroded and wore out engine parts! but it did reduce friction as quoted. So not all friction reducing ideas work over the long haul.
 

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froze said:
..... It would be cheaper to run the factory original lube till it wore off and just buy another chain. .....
With some of the prices I've seen for chains online and the fact that you have to send it to someone and pay them $25.00 (+ shipping cost), this is as true a statement as I've seen on this thread. I also agree with froze that if you are totally set on using nothing but wax, you're better off, cost wise, doing it yourself using any method that you prefer.

A chain is going to stretch with or without the use of wax, even if the friction is reduced on the pivot pins. As I mentioned, I clean and lube my chain once a week, which for me is around 200-250 miles. I get anywhere from 2,000-3,000 miles on a chain (depending on which one I buy). If I sent in my chain to be waxed every week, it would cost me the price of the chain plus $200 to $300 (plus shipping) for waxing it, during the lifetime of the chain. I only pay $49-$59 dollars for my chains (I buy locally). I don't know what math you use but I just can't see the benefit or the savings here, no matter how I look at it.
 

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I don't think there was any mention of cost savings ... Indeed, I agree that if you are doing a high mileage then it is better to do the re-waxing yourself. The initial cleaning, even for brand new chains is important ... That's about a 2.5-3 hour process. Once waxed, the dirt will stay out so a re-waxing can be as simple as wiping the chain with a damp rag and dipping in molten wax for 15-20 minutes. Friction-facts pitches their wax chain as a "race" chain probably as an admission that this is a fairly expensive proposition and not for everyone. Doing it yourself is not much more expensive than oil lubes though.


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