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Junior Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Would the sc lager be a good first time fixie? What advise parts wise are a must have? I want to put miles on my bike and maybe a little trick riding:) any advise is good advise! Thank u
 

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^^^^^The absolute best advice for putting distance on your bike: get out and ride, ride, ride. You're rather vague, though. It sounds like you're young? Haven't ridden much? What type of bike?
TRICK RIDING? best advice I could give there is to keep the rubber on the road and your butt in the seat!
If you're new to riding, condition yourself to distances:start out slow and short, then work yourself up in speed, distances, as you feel comfortable with, but push yourself, also. ...IF YOU'RE HEALTHY ENOUGH TO DO SO! if you have a good bike, keep it good! Take care of it. If you have a Walmart type bike. .......you'll feel it!
Lager? ....best beer I know of is Warsteiner Dunkel! After that, some beers from Saranac Brewery....Bud products are like those Walmart bikes! Beer flavored water!
Sorry, if the answers are vague....but the questions. ..... ;-)
 

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Junior Member
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm 38 and have rode mtb dirt jump bikes, cross country, down hill and bmx. My question is being that this is my first fixie bike are there any must have bike parts to help make my first fixie bike great? What toe straps do u suggest! Any good/great tires, what computers if any do u use? What handle bars are good all around bars?
 

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Ah, much better questions, my friend. Most everything one buys is only due to preference, and or trial and error. I prefer the Speedplay type cleat, but there are several other types, such as the Look Keo type, or the egg beater type. Or, just plain pedal, with/without strap. All preference. Everyone here will give their taste. As for tires. Again preference. I was a Continental Gatorskin user, until I tried the Vittoria Diamante Pro. I'm a distance rider, I want a tire that is dependable and forgiving if I inadvertently ride through broken glass or rocky road. Get a tire that is VERY RELIABLE! PERIOD!
Computers; you can't go wrong with a Garmin.Most all of them are very reliable, or, use your smartphone with a tracker app, like Strava, or Mapmyride.
Are you going to ride distances? Again, start out slow, sorry, build yourself up. Distance riding is awesome! And to mix that distance with bike packing for overnight camping is great! Best to you
 

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retromike3
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274 Posts
Not quite old school.

The pedals I prefer are old alloy mountain bike pedals with dual mountain bike type toe clips. That and New Balance cross trainers gives me almost a boot when it comes to tread. I personally am not a big fan of clipless pedals on mountain bikes (even though I own several sets of the road bike variety ).

I really like going with the concept of K.I.S.S.: keep it simple stupid. The simplest solution is usually the most efficient.

Question: Why did they come up with clipless of pedals for mountain bikes?

Answer: So they could set mountain bikers up like they do skiers so they have to buy special shoes and bindings.

I think this is a total scam and the even went so far when they first started doing chairlifts for mountain bikers is they tried to change the color of the bike every year like they do with skis.

Suppose I just want to hop on my bike ride down to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. Does that mean I have to put on my special mountain bike shoes? (Which probably and are uncomfortable to walk around in any way) and if I don't does that mean I can't pull up on the pedals anymore?

What I used to do back in the Neolithic era I kept a pair of moccasins in my back jersey pocket so that way I didn't have to walk on pavement with my cleated shoes I'd stop at the place I wanted to be at, take off my cycling shoes and put on my moccasins and walk around in those things.
 

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2,871 Posts
A lot of fixie riders like these straps. http://www.origin8.bike/product-description/?prod_model_uid=6556 I like Time ATAC pedals. For road and trail. I don't ride fixed gear but mountain bike pedals are the way to go if you want to go clipless, road shoes are ridiculous. You can't walk in them.

I'd ride the bike stock but if you swap out the bullhorns for drop bars, I wouldn't hate you for it. :) These are popular but you might prefer the additional hand position of a standard road handlebar. http://www.benscycle.com/p-4405-nitto-b125-steel-track-handlebar.aspx

I usually don't replace stuff until it breaks or wears out but thats just me.

Recommended, helmet, gloves, padded shorts. Agree on the Garmin cyclocomputer.

Someone who actually rides fixed might respond with more specific advice.
 

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Junior Member
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259 Posts
Have you acquired a bike?

If you really think you will ride the bike on a regular basis invest in a quality frame. A frame you will not want to replace and cry when someone steals it.
Gear ratio, wheel/tire combo, all the components are dependent of type of riding and your personal preference. IMHO there is no best ".....". If on a budget invest in the frame and then upgrade components as you figure out what works best for you.

That all said. Check-out Wabi Cycles. With exception of an old AmericanClassic seat post, SelleAnatomica saddle and Conti 28mm tires it's a stock Classic. After hours and miles of saddle time I'm still happy. Very smooth ride, accelerates nice, climbs nice, tracks like on rails for high speed wide sweeping curves. Stinks diving into tight turns at high speeds and lacks that quick twitch handling. Just a cruiser now so the weak "crit" handling is no issue.
 

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spin... spin.. spin
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1,785 Posts
I have an old steel road bike with a new style groupset on it. Not my main ride but it is a solid good bike. Especially for longer rides on rougher roads.

To me the Wabi would be a great choice.

Agree with you completely. One exception is wheelset. A good wheelset is worth more value to the rider than a good frameset. I would ride pretty much any road bike frame if you put the right wheelset on it. Obviously not meaning you can get a really poor frame and put the best wheels on it and be happy. But basically when I shop complete bikes all I really look at is wheelset for the price point. Though usually I shop frames and do a build up with components I want. Caution this method is more expensive than buying a complete bike.

But my example would be a Scott road bike, now available to order online vs say a Specialized one. After deciding on frame size, I would find the one in my price range and compare both companies bike at that price point. My fisrt comparison and possibly only one would be the wheels.

That is the beauty of smaller companies like Wabi or Messi and many others, they sometimes offer bikes with great wheelsets at good prices and they make quality frames.
 

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spin... spin.. spin
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1,785 Posts
To be specific about fixies. I personally would not put a computer on my fixie. A huge part of the appeal is the simplicity. Plus if you mean actually fixed like a track bike, your cadence is not something you have control over. Basically, you would be keeping miles and speed only. Just my opinion but a cycling computer on a fixed gear bike is not needed and maybe even strange. But that said it is your bike and if you want one get one.

My fixed gear bike is an actual track bike. Here is why: I like you wanted something I could ride on the track. Now, you can ride any fixed geared bike around town but if going to go on the veledrome, the hipster city fixie would be a really crappie track bike. They are cool and have their place but if seriously wanting to track ride get an actual track bike.

Now the downside to a real track bike: They are way too expensive to chain up at the market. The gearing is for the track... Unlike say a hipster bike with fixed gears that has a more managable gear ratio. When you hit a hill on your track bike, it is gonna be no fun. But at the same time this gearing is partially why if going to actually track ride, only a true track bike makes sense. Also track bikes have no brakes at all. Where most city style fixies have at least a front hand brake.

My preference on the track or on the street is clipless pedals. They make some really nice walkable clipless shoes these days. I also prefer drop bars over anything else. If going toe clips get something retro looking. If going clipless pedals get a pair of lace up cycling shoes that look like normal shoes.

But again even on a fixed bike your wheelset is going to make the most difference in how well it rides.
 

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spin... spin.. spin
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1,785 Posts
Oh last thought... I ride a lot but not as much as Q. And want to mention if really wanting to put miles on, you may want to think about singlespeed over fixed. One reason is you can sell it easier if after riding with only one gear you realise it is not for you. Plus, putting a lot of miles on a fixed gear bike is a killer. There is no rest coasting or soft pedaling. They do make some singlespeed wheels that are fixed one side freewheel the other. That maybe is a good option as by flipping the wheel you can try either style and see what suits you.

Last advice practice stopping on a fixie someplace safe before having to do so at a red light. Even when used to it, suddenly stopping a fixie can be a bit of an adventure with rough or wet tarmac. I have many times seen pro track riders eat hardwood in the veledrome because of the affect that occurs when one stops pedalling a fixed gear bike.

Specific fixie parts.. Anything made for the actual track is 100 times stronger than the stuff made for the street. Now the issue actual track gears thread onto the hub and may not fit on a city fixie wheel. Also, if you get track wheels and cogsyour gear choices are more limited. Ut can be accomidated by the chain ring size. Basically anything Campy or Dura Ace track parts is bomb proof. Miche makes great track stuff also. Lot of strain on a fixie chain, cog and hub. So I prefer the track stuff over the really available hipster city equipment.
 

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Junior Member
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259 Posts
Wheelsets

Yes, don't skimp.

Not sure about the latest version of the stock Wabi wheelset, but still riding on the older version of stock with the delux freewheel on one side. Flip-flop hub gives you the options of fixed or single-speed. Solid and relatively light weight for clinchers. Gravel, fire roads and rough pavement haven't had any negative effect. I'm a relative lightweight. Also running 28mm tires.

Using clipless pedals, but also riding the Wabi primarily as a SS. Relatively solid track stand, but the longer and steeper downhills around here makes riding SS my prefered choice. Don't find clipless any more difficult than cinched down clipped system. Track stand is a relatively easy essential skill to develop.

Those Origin8 caught my attention. Might work on the rebuild of the '84 Stumpjumper. The Bearclaw pedals present a clip/strap issue. Would probably go that route if using a FG for urban commuting, runs to the corner store.
 
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