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Discussion Starter #1
This is your fitness editor here. LISTEN TO ME PEOPLE!!!!!!

I'm adding things to my editorial calendar for the remainder of the year so of there's something you'd like to know, post the question and get the answer!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hmmmm, seated or standing? How the H am I supposed to answer that one?
"MY GOD JIM, IM A TRAINER NOT RICHARD SIMMONS!!"
 

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But, you seem to know everything
 

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Two skinny J's
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There's a hundred things but now that you put in the limelight I'll be damned if I can think of one !
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Jahwarrior said:
But, you seem to know everything
You are correct sir! :) I'm actually working in a science if fat loss article at the moment. Hopefully in the next day or two it will be up.
 

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Don't always comment but do read your articles. Looking forward to the science of fat loss articles as they may give insight into how I can personally adapt my exercise/diet regimens to work accordingly.
 

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Two skinny J's
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Best way to balance muscle groups :)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
rola643 said:
Best way to balance muscle groups :)
The best way to balance the muscle groups, great question. Here's the answer:
Full body compound movements.

Meaning, try to involve as many limbs moving as possible with each lift. Plus, the metabolic tissue activation is a lot higher so you will burn more calories as wells as develop a deeper neural connection between your brain and your muscles.

So this means doing:
Kettlebell swings
Turkish Get Ups
Farmers Walks (love this one)
Deadlifts with trap bar or kettlebell
Standing and pushing/pulling (great exercise)
Over DB/KB press (great anti cycling exercise)
Hip hinge row
Anti rotation holds
Planks
Pretty much anything the involves the arms and legs moving together through the trunk.

Once your master these, you can take most of the above mentioned lifts to a single leg variation. YouTube "glute triple threat." it doesn't get much better than this to hammer the posterior chain (back half of the body) on one leg which is critical to anyone who rides a bike.

I'm not a big isolation exercise fan (bi curls, Tri extensions, etc) because they waste a lot of time, and aren't very functional. Now, if you want the big guns, you can do them. Just know there are more efficient ways to train.

Plus, you can get all of the shoulder, tricep shoulder work from chest work and bicep and forearm work from back work. Hit the same beach muscles, just do it in a way that incorporates the whole body.

If you do perform these lifts, use alternate arm patterns. This will involve diagonal trunk stabilization more. Split your stance and this demand goes up even more.

I'm also not a seated machine fan. Based on what I've read and seen first hand, it's an inferior way to train by far due to the reduced stabilizer demands, repetitive stress/pattern overload affect that can damage soft tissues, loss of flexibility from single plane movement (same reason why cycling kills flexibility) and the potential to rewire neural commands to the muscles.

Plus, depending on the exercise, you can put a ton of sheer forces into the lumbar spine which is never a good thing. It isn't uncommon for people
To develop lumbar spine disc issues from a leg press and a prone ham curls machine as well.

Standing exercise will always be superior to anything seated because of the direct carry over to our daily movements.

As far as frequency, we use 2x/week and 3x/week programs. If you go on a Tu/Th schedule it should look like this:
Tu: legs + compound pulls
Th: legs + compound press

MWF looks like this you can manipulate the workouts however you'd like, but here's a couple of ways it can look:
Day 1: lower body + standing trunk work
Day 2: upper body pull + lower body unloading (body weight work) + core
Day 3: upper body press + single leg lower body + core

Option 2 (this is what I use for myself)
Day 1: total body + core
Day 2: total body + core
Day 3: total body + core + mobility for the weekend

If you need even more programming ideas, pick any of the books from the "New Rules of Lifting" book series. Hope this helps!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
kneedrachen said:
I'll bite. The best exercises to alleviate neck cramps/tightness on/after a ride. I know fit is important here, but I've heard some stretches are not good for your neck while others are.

Also, why the heck is it only my calves that cramp?
Neck mobility, very good topic. The easiest answer is to get Aaron Mattes' "Active isolated stretching: the Mattes Method" book. By far the best book on stretching published to date.

Very often, neck mobility is a factor of thoracic spine mobility and lat strength. If you've got poor lat strength it is more difficult to keep a neutral/tall chest which in turn will negatively affect thoracic spine mobility. It also allows the shoulders to round which will always lead to reduced neck range of motion.

This is why single arm rotator cuff exercises don't fix poor shoulder range of motion issues. Regardless of how many you do, if you've got forward rounded shoulders from poor t-spine mobility, it won't help.

I the neck is getting stiff, it is typically the end result of something below it that needs more strength. Surprisingly enough, low glute strength can affect neck mobility as well.

I'm hesitant to advise neck stretches because if you do it incorrectly, you can really do a number on yourself. The neck responds better to range of motion work that it does static stretching due to the neural components at play. Ive also read due to the arteries of the neck that can be stressed negatively, you want to move the neck to open it up.

YouTube "face pulls," pretty good exercise for the upper back that can help with the neck.

Calf cramps could come from several factors:
Seat too high
Cleat too far back
Lack of glute strength stressing the hams more
Not enough pushing down in the pedal stroke
Hydration levels
Sodium levels (keep in mind you lose 600ml of sodium for every liter of fluid you perspire)
Muscle Imbalances overloading the calves
Over pronation/supination of the foot can also contribute
Ph balance issues from your diet
Shallow chest breathing patterns that don't allow enough CO2 release when you exhale

Hope this helps!
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Industry_Hack said:
I'm thinking that sprints on foot and bike are going to be my best options at this point.
Yep, high intensity interval training is the best way to burn fat. The reason is because it depletes the muscles of nutrients/sugar and you will use more energy (ie calories) to put them back together. It costs you more calories to replenish glycogen stores than it does fat stores.

You burn more calories faster than you do with longer more steady state efforts. Plus, the engine burns hotter longer post HIT workout than it does with steady state efforts. This means you keep burning calories longer post effort.

EPOC (Post Exercise Oxygen Consumption) is the reason why.
 

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What's the best way to balance commuting and training? Lately I've been commuting to and from work, but it seems in terms of getting stronger, these might just be junk miles. My morning commute is about 20 miles and my afternoon is about 30. I drive in to work Monday morning, leave my supplies for the week, and commute to and from work from Monday evening through Thursday morning. I then ride the local intermediate shop ride Thursday evenings. It seems like if I push either the morning or afternoon commute too hard, I'm sore on the subsequent ride. What would be good to incorporate into these for a little more training? Is there a schedule that allows training and this amount of commuter miles to coexist?
 

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Yep, high intensity interval training is the best way to burn fat. The reason is because it depletes the muscles of nutrients/sugar and you will use more energy (ie calories) to put them back together. It costs you more calories to replenish glycogen stores than it does fat stores.

You burn more calories faster than you do with longer more steady state efforts. Plus, the engine burns hotter longer post HIT workout than it does with steady state efforts. This means you keep burning calories longer post effort.

EPOC (Post Exercise Oxygen Consumption) is the reason why.
So intervals around the neighborhood on my BMX bike will make me as skinny as I was back in the day. That actually makes sense. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Industry_Hack said:
So intervals around the neighborhood on my BMX bike will make me as skinny as I was back in the day. That actually makes sense. :thumbsup:
And taller too!
 

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i got one... I don't get the chance to ride anywhere near as much and often as i'd like but i still want to train for personal goals of fitness, group rides, and maybe even a race some day.. I have the opertunity to run alot more than ride.. so my question is: will running aide my riding that much? if so which is the better way to train. shorter distance pushing myself as much as possible. or longer distance easier?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
What's the best way to balance commuting and training? Lately I've been commuting to and from work, but it seems in terms of getting stronger, these might just be junk miles. My morning commute is about 20 miles and my afternoon is about 30. I drive in to work Monday morning, leave my supplies for the week, and commute to and from work from Monday evening through Thursday morning. I then ride the local intermediate shop ride Thursday evenings. It seems like if I push either the morning or afternoon commute too hard, I'm sore on the subsequent ride. What would be good to incorporate into these for a little more training? Is there a schedule that allows training and this amount of commuter miles to coexist?
Alright, here we go. The good news is you've probably got a decent base to build on, so having that out of the way is huge, well done!

You can very easily pull this off, by doing this:
Monday: noodle pace home
Tue: morning noodle, evening hammer
Wed: Noodle each way
Thu: Noodle in, hammer on the shop ride.
Fri: STRETCH+ROLL OUT
SAT: Ride and stretch roll out
SUN: same as Saturday

They key is to try and mix in recovery rides with the hammering. I'd also recommend every 4th week trying to drive at least 2 days that week to give yourself some recovery. Ideally it would be the whole week, but that depends on how you'd like to play that.

Typically, the second ride of the day is usually the better one because you "opened" your legs on the first one and its easier to come by some good form in the afternoon.

The thing that will help you the most is to hammer rolling and stretching. Maybe even a good mineral salt bath a couple three times a week as well.

Ideally at least bridging for your glutes, and maybe some single leg squats as well. WTH, let's also toss in some planks and prone holds to hit the whole body without crushing it.

The whole ball of wax will fall apart if you don't get at least 7 hours a sleep each night.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
i got one... I don't get the chance to ride anywhere near as much and often as i'd like but i still want to train for personal goals of fitness, group rides, and maybe even a race some day.. I have the opertunity to run alot more than ride.. so my question is: will running aide my riding that much? if so which is the better way to train. shorter distance pushing myself as much as possible. or longer distance easier?
In 2008 I couldn't ride for a month, but I could run. My then coach targeted a 5K, and then it was 3-7:00 min run intervals at a hate my life pace 5x/week to prepare.

Right about the time I was able to ride again, there was a MTB race (12 miles) that I wanted to do. Without having ridden in a month and only running, I did the race and finished on the podium.

I felt pretty good the next day as well. The running intervals built up a pretty good motor, and then it was just time to sit and push the pedals down. There wasn't much climbing (700-900' max) so I was able to do it. If there were was 2x-3x that amount in elevation gain, it would've been a different story. Most likely not a pretty one.

The moral of the story is you can use running to train for bike racing if you do enough intervals. Longer and slower won't build the motor you need to race. You've got to do high intensity work to "over build" your engine.

The downside is, you can only go like this for about 6-8 weeks until you need a break of a 7-10 days of lower intensity training. So you've got to bake that in to each training block.

I'd recommend interval runs on Tu/Th, and whatever kind of riding you like to do on the weekends. Just make sure you get in at least two climbs of 15-25 mins each ride. If you've got the luxury of a long enough hill at about 6-8%, 3x20 min hill repeats will go a long way to build fitness.

Hope that helps!
 
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