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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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About an hour ago, i left a bike at the bike Doc for a a few part replacements and to check everything over.

It was a sad moment exiting the shop without my bike.
It is a sad thing to visit the LBS with a bike and then to leave without one. Happily, the other side of that equation is way better :D. I hope your steed is freed soon.
 

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Old, fat, and slow
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So I just did some tune-up work .... dialed in two rear derailleurs, adjusted a front derailleur cable, cleaned a chain .... I might be slow but dang it, I deserve smooth, silent shifting. Put a new mirror on where the old one had broken ...

But anyway, there is this.
Bicycle Wheel Bicycle wheel Tire Bicycles--Equipment and supplies

This is a Dost, a German-made electric that I saw a couple riding (well, each had his and her own) on a group ride. The guy was loving his, but the lady was less thrilled because it was a hilly ride and the bike weighs 50 pounds---and the assist was not assisting.

Turns out the controls are not designed for human ergonomics---she was shutting off the assist adjuster with her wrist whenever she reached for the boost to get up a hill.

It isn't really funny ... unless you are not the poor lady wrestling a 50-pound behemoth up an 8-percent incline. Since I am not, i have to laugh .... now when she cannot hear me.

Anyway, they are apparently excellent machines, but be real careful with cockpit setup.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
Joined
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5,874 Posts
So I just did some tune-up work .... dialed in two rear derailleurs, adjusted a front derailleur cable, cleaned a chain .... I might be slow but dang it, I deserve smooth, silent shifting. Put a new mirror on where the old one had broken ...

But anyway, there is this. View attachment 54919
This is a Dost, a German-made electric that I saw a couple riding (well, each had his and her own) on a group ride. The guy was loving his, but the lady was less thrilled because it was a hilly ride and the bike weighs 50 pounds---and the assist was not assisting.

Turns out the controls are not designed for human ergonomics---she was shutting off the assist adjuster with her wrist whenever she reached for the boost to get up a hill.

It isn't really funny ... unless you are not the poor lady wrestling a 50-pound behemoth up an 8-percent incline. Since I am not, i have to laugh .... now when she cannot hear me.

Anyway, they are apparently excellent machines, but be real careful with cockpit setup.
Nice troubleshooting! That's cool you were able to figure it out.
 

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Old, fat, and slow
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1,156 Posts
I didn't figure it out, the lady's husband did. They were near the back of the pack so they were still talking about the ride when I finally finished.

Pretty much everyone else had already retired to the brewery, which I figure is the incentive to take such a horrible ride. One of the fast guys passed me calling out, "I just burned 1300 calories--I have earned my beer." Suddenly I understood.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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5,874 Posts
I did nothing myself, but spoke to a wrench who confirmed that building a new 20" rear wheel for my recumbent will be a $300 proposition, and the parts situation remains...fluid. On the happy side, the new wheel should feature a double walled rim and heavy duty spokes. My internet special $75 rear wheel lasted a couple of seasons and maybe 3k mi before the spokes began failing in job lots. That's a bit of hyperbole, but 5 let go one after the next, and a detailed examination revealed several more on the verge of failure. I only looked because of the strange ticking noise coming intermittently from behind me while I rode. Glad I did 😲.

I should have gotten pics before rolling it down to the shop, but didn't. Should have had a wheel custom built when the last one failed, but I thought I'd save a little money. I should have known better. Skimping on wheels is the wrong answer for someone whose routes include gravel and mild singletrack on a heavy recumbent, towing a trailer with a small dog aboard. Recumbents are notorious for beating the crap out of their rear wheels as it is. Now mine will hopefully be up to the task.
 

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You are lucky. I don't trust my local shop with wheel-building (since the guy failed to fix a wheel but didn't fail to charge full price for not fixing it) and when I tried to order a custom wheel online I couldn't get a response---I guess during the height of Covid nobody could get any parts.

You can get parts and have a guy who can build wheels---you are set. A good wheel, while expensive, is a great investment, IMO. Pay once or many times, sort of thing.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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5,874 Posts
You are lucky. I don't trust my local shop with wheel-building (since the guy failed to fix a wheel but didn't fail to charge full price for not fixing it) and when I tried to order a custom wheel online I couldn't get a response---I guess during the height of Covid nobody could get any parts.

You can get parts and have a guy who can build wheels---you are set. A good wheel, while expensive, is a great investment, IMO. Pay once or many times, sort of thing.
You are right. I'm grateful to have someone I trust to build a wheel for me. I hope ;). This will be the shop's first go in that respect, though they've done a lot of other solid work. I'm sorry to hear you've had trouble with the custom online route. I can vouch for the fact that non-custom options are less than helpful in the long term.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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5,874 Posts
Today I finally mounted the panniers on canine companion Chip's trailer. Then I mounted the 2nd set on the front of my touring bike and adjusted them for proper fit. I've been meaning to do that for a minute. The Burley panniers are a lot more capacious than I'd realized in initially looking them over.
Bicycle Wheel Tire Window Bicycles--Equipment and supplies
The panniers attached to the trailer are actually loaded. The panniers on the bike are not. Note that the Burley panniers are technically designed for use with their Coho XC trailer, but they also work nicely as front panniers. Also note that my Ortlieb handlebar bag is now present for the sake of form, not function: my crash 2 days ago compromised its structure; it can no longer carry more than a token amount of weight. I am exploring replacement options now.

I also adjusted the IGH on Mrs. Newleaf's ea-commuter bike and installed a cycling computer on her pink and orange fat bike. Road tested both of the latter, but sorry no pics.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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5,874 Posts
Not sure it counts as doing something to a bike, but today I also emptied my underseat bag for the first time in, well, years. It s qr mount was broken in the crash and cannot be replaced or repaired. I was frankly a little surprised by all the stuff I found in there. It seems I've been adding things piece by piece for a bit.
Grey Camera accessory Auto part Cameras & optics Gas
Such a small thing, but with the lower lip broken off, the bag can no longer mount to its qr plate. Bummer.

Luggage and bags Bag Technology Font Wire

It held a lot! This is just from the lower expano pocket, which I never expanded, only stuffed full. That's a bunch of zip ties, a latex glove for brake work, a quick link, bike multi-tool, pressure gauge, and emergency replacement spoke kit in the bag on the top.

Plant Pliers Asphalt Wire Electrical wiring
Now to start on the main compartment.

Luggage and bags Sports equipment Sunglasses Bag Plant
I've noticed about every time I remove them that my bike feels lighter without the underseat and handlebar bags in place. Perhaps this shot helps explain why. Here we see the things described before plus a chain tool, tire boots, needle nosed pliers and cutters, a ratchet set with glueless patches and tire levers. Also a 2nd set of orange tire levers and a yellow quick lever. Yet more zip ties, an old school glue patch kit, a mini roll of duct tape, a Park Tool multitool, a Gerber non-bike multitool, a spare tube, and a little red plastic bag containing my emergency contact information and some emergency cash.

Most recently the latter came in handy when I ran across a lemonade stand somewhere past mi 40 of the Elephant Rock metric century event in June. I had cards on me, but no cash. I didn't exactly need the hydration as I had a full load of water bottles and a Camelbak, but I did need the thin excuse to stop and catch my breath. It was sweet to remember the bag, pull it out, and pay $5 for a $0.50 glass of lemonade. I'm a generous tipper, don't you know :D. That stop felt great.

Funny thing is, I carry more tools and food elsewhere. Today helped me realize I've added tools to this bag over time without necessarily accounting for the ones I already had. There are 7 tire levers in this photo, for example. I definitely don't need that many, but I have broken levers more than once and appreciate having extras. Still, [email protected] The number of zip ties is also....excessive. Some are great, but I'm pretty sure I added 'some' more than once on the theory that I hadn't thought to do so before. Things were packed pretty tightly, with the most-used tools easy to grab, the rest stowed Tetris style. Zip ties just kept emerging :D. Some of the tool duplication was intended, but not all. Not ideal.
 
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Old, fat, and slow
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Three multi-tools, three pair of pliers .... and only one tube? Oh .... two different types of patch kits.

Very thorough ....

Suggested photo caption: When "Overkill" becomes mass murder.

But I have a similar thought process .... I would rather carry and not need it than the alternative.

I have also broken tire levers .... Once on a night ride where I really did end up on a roadside in tall grass, where every time I dropped a lever it took a safari to find it .... with a brand-new tire which seemed to be a bout five millimeters smaller in diameter than the rim. I ended up using and damaging my spare house-key and the end of my chain tool---and somewhat savaging my metal rims---so seven levers seems about right to me.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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5,874 Posts
Three multi-tools, three pair of pliers .... and only one tube? Oh .... two different types of patch kits.

Very thorough ....

Suggested photo caption: When "Overkill" becomes mass murder.

But I have a similar thought process .... I would rather carry and not need it than the alternative.

I have also broken tire levers .... Once on a night ride where I really did end up on a roadside in tall grass, where every time I dropped a lever it took a safari to find it .... with a brand-new tire which seemed to be a bout five millimeters smaller in diameter than the rim. I ended up using and damaging my spare house-key and the end of my chain tool---and somewhat savaging my metal rims---so seven levers seems about right to me.
Overkill to mass murder...😂🤣🥰. You express it perfectly!

On that note, it is true that only one tube is pictured above, or carried in my underseat bag. I carry a 2nd bike-sized tube in my Camelbak. Chip's trailer is equipped with an onboard spare tube. Typically only one, though I'd add another for extended trips. Also in the Camelbak? More tire levers. I may need to re-evaluate, even if your safari story inclines me to do the opposite. Ugh! The Camelbak also holds modern patch kits, along with a first aid kit, a Life Straw, and an honest to goodness lensatic compass. Among other things like TP and paper towels, lol. You said something about having something you don't need vs. needing something you don't have. I know nothing of such thinking 😃.

All the patch kits are somewhat amusing given that I run Slime, which renders patches useless. My spare tubes are not Slimed however. Nor, generally, are the tubes of those I've stopped to help with flats. I instinctively trust the old school glue patches more than I do the modern glueless types despite the fact that I've had great luck with the latter when I have tried them. Nevermind that I've usually done that after discovering my 'old reliable' tube of glue has dried out and is now useless. It's inevitable and I know that, but I continue to be biased toward the old school solution. No logic there, just emotional inertia from the way I did it as a kid.
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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Holy...what luck! Turns out, I don't need a replacement underseat bag after all. I already have one!

Several years ago, I bought an underseat bag just after getting my touring bike. Within less than 100mi I either crashed or in adjusting it broke the QR mount on the bike saddle side. This just before a trip to YNP. Solved easily enough by purchasing a 2nd identical bag from REI where they remained in stock.

That left me with a pair of essentially brand new bags but only one functional QR mount.

When I crashed just recently, the bag-side QR mount went, rendering that bag unmountable. REI has naturally long since stopped making that bag. Then I remembered the first bag. The one I kept for years because I hated to throw something nearly brand new and perfectly functional away, even if it was useless. Silly, I know. It paid off though!
Wood Luggage and bags Mesh Reflex camera Camera lens
I tried to glue the saddle side mount but that was obviously a non-starter.

Camera lens Bag Grey Wood Audio equipment
Intact QR mount on the bag side. See above for a shot of the broken mount. That leaves me still needing a new handlebar bag and probably a new helmet, but it looks like my pack rat's ways have saved me the need to buy a new underseat bag just yet. Score!
 

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Deranged Touring Cyclist
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Today I packed my new/old under seat bag and just like that, you can hardly tell that a change was made. I also have a lot of respect for the old bag's quality: it had been there for literally 20k mi of riding on in all weather and still looked good.
Shoe Synthetic rubber Grey Sneakers Outdoor shoe
Technically the bag on the right is the newer of the two, the one on the left having been bought first but put into storage within its first 100mi due to a broken qr mount on the saddle side. That's when the bag on the right was purchased and installed, where it spent the next 20k mi of the bike's life. Note the broken lip on the QR mount which ended this bag's ride.

Shoe Sleeve Grey Sportswear Font
The 20k mi bottom bag seems to have swollen over its barely used counterpart and is a little faded, but not much. Little in the way of discoloration either.

Shoe Grey Sports gear Glove Sneakers
In re-packing the new/old bag, I actually deleted a multitool and some packaging. Believe it or not ;). The two started out identical in size.
 
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