What to do???

Discussion in 'General Bike Discussion' started by photosbymark, Oct 28, 2010.

  1. photosbymark

    photosbymark New Member

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    Well pondering what to do with a perplexing problem. My road bike just seems to be just a bit to small, and tried everything I can think of to deal with a seat post to get me enough setback to solve the problem. Like it is, knee problems are the result. I bought a Sun Ray to deal with that, but I have a bike in the garage that is too expensive to just give away and in the way to not be able to ride it.

    The problem with the recumbent is that its just a pain to transport anywhere by car, and I have an idea for a book I am about to start. I am going to take a few days at my hometown and go re ride the streets I rode as a small boy, now about 40 years later. I want to see what's different, how things have changed, and probably more importantly how I have changed as I pedal through time. I have a couple of options. One of which is to go find an old ten speed much like I rode all those years ago and make the rides on something like the ride I had back in the day. Trouble is the body isn't in back in the day mode.

    I was thinking maybe a hybrid or comfort bike with skinny tires might be the ticket. It should transport much easier. When the bike will have to ride maybe 500 miles on at times fairly rough interstate, its a consideration. The carrier I have that I got for the road bike would work well for those. The hybrid would likely have better gearing, but the 26 might be an advantage at times too in that I have some spares for that. I guess I could get road gearing on a comfort bike, and then have the extra wheel with more mountain bike type gearing as well.

    The recumbent on the other hand might be wise to build a better carrier. Though I have loaded on the current carrier and its been ok, its never been for over a few minutes. It is a long wheelbase and a platform that would fit into the two inch trailer receiver might be a better method. Still maybe better to ride it on a bike closer to what I had as a kid. Then again I don't expect it to be that much about the bike. It also leaves me still with a bike in the garage that I can't ride if I don't trade it in on another bike. grin

    One option is to just pick up one when I get there, but that leave a lot to chance. Another is a folder, but I can't imagine one of those really being comfortable enough for more than a couple of miles at a time.

    The rides won't be that long at a time. The max might be 30 miles in one day, but I don't what to be miserable either. Suggestions and thoughts would be appreciated.
     
  2. whyeyebike

    whyeyebike New Member

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    My first thought would be, if your road bike is causing problems with your knee; another road bike may be just as much of a problem, even if it is larger. If your going to go the route of a hybrid, do you have a bike shop around you that you can demo one? That way you can verify that a hybrid bike, your size; won't aggrevate your knee.

    I would think that if you are in to riding recumbents, you would want to solve the problem of not being able to easily lug it around. That might be your best option, and will do wonders for the knee problems.

    The one thing I can tell you is, don't ride the small road bike if its causing knee problems and you can't adjust it anymore. No amount of riding is worth that pain, and I know the feeling well.
     

  3. photosbymark

    photosbymark New Member

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    Yea I came to that conclusion the hard way. Sad thing is I really liked the bike. The problem was one that didn't surface on the typical test ride. It was close enough that it felt fine until you put some miles on it. The typical test ride won't tell me. I did learn to what to watch for in that my knee was in front of the pedal so it not at 90 degrees at the 3 9 oclock position. Knee was ahead of the pedals. The crank forward may be the way to go, but I don't have to do anything right away. Then again you are probably right when you said its probably best to figure out a better way to lug the sunray around.
     
  4. BobH

    BobH New Member

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    You might try a ride on a Giant Suede, the crank is far forward. The one that I tried was very friendly to ride. I ended up buying a Sedona, after about 3 weeks of riding, I realized that my saddle was simply too far forward.

    For me the solition was to modify a ridgid seat post. I dropped down from the top of the post and cut it off at about a 55 degree angle. I then welded it together with about 110 degree included angle, this allowed me to move the seat rearward about 2 more inches. So far, I'm pleased with the modification. Possibly, you might be able to purchase such a post for a free style bike. If you would like more info, email me.

    BobH
     
  5. photosbymark

    photosbymark New Member

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    I have a neighbor that has a tubing bender I found out this week. I am going to try to see how much of a bend it can take rather than cutting and welding. What I have is an aluminum post and would not be as easy to weld. I could braze it, and might braze a brace on there for extra strength. A seat post is one thing I wouldn't want to break considering the metal and where it would impact. That would be one literal PIA.
     
  6. BobH

    BobH New Member

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    I cheated, I cut and welded a 25.4 mm steel seat post. I fitted a 39.2mm to 25.4mm adapter to it. I bought the adapter from the LBS. The original seat post is a spring loaded aluminum job.

    BobH
     
  7. LarryM

    LarryM Eocyclist

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    If reach to the handle bars is the problem, a longer stem might help.
     
  8. photosbymark

    photosbymark New Member

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    The problem was the knees were too far forward causing a pain.
     
  9. BlazingPedals

    BlazingPedals Member

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    I'm not sure why the knees being forward from the pedals would cause pain. Most often, knee pain is a result of incorrect extension, or due to improper foot orientation on the pedals.
     
  10. LarryM

    LarryM Eocyclist

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    +1 I'd suggest adjusting the seat height first.
     
  11. whyeyebike

    whyeyebike New Member

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    Knees being to far forward, and over the pedals can lead to pain in the front of the knee (anterior). I found this good article (click here) that describes several different types of knee problems relating to cycling and the possible causes. I can tell you that I suffered from severe knee pain last year, and the resolution was simply to move my seat back, which in turn pulled my knees back so they weren't so far forward and ahead of the peddles. It made all the difference for me.
     
  12. photosbymark

    photosbymark New Member

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    You are exactly right as I can tell from first hand experience. Trouble is my seat was all the way back when it caused the pain, Will see how the modified seat post works and how I made the modifications when they are done.
     
  13. BobH

    BobH New Member

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    Hi,

    I just realized I left out an important bit of info. I went back to the old style of seat clamp to use on a round seat post. The seat frame bars still can slide in the clamp.

    Sorry for the lapse.

    BobH
     
  14. LarryM

    LarryM Eocyclist

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    Good article. Thanks