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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am very interested in riding for physical fitness. Since starting my new lifestyle changes, I have already dropped 10 lbs (from 279-269); I plan on continued success. I need to purchase a wheel set to accommodate my weight without breaking the bank. My buddy gave me an old Peugeot Carbolite 103 bicycle (pro gratis) to fix up and get riding. Needing new wheels, cassette, and handle bar grips--I figured this would be simple enough, but I think I may be in for an expensive adventure. I welcome any and all suggestions on how to help get me and my body out on the road.

Thanks.
 

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cfd78, sorry that I cannot add too much to your question about wheels, but I can say welcome to Two Spoke! Also, congrats on your decision to change your lifestyle and live longer!! Biking is a good way to do both!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What is the rear hub spacing? Wheel size?
I just went outside and removed the rear wheel... it's a 27-1/4" rim. I measured the inside of the rear fork; it measures 5" (or 127mm). I'm not really sure how to remove the hub and measure it.
 

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You should use a rear hub with 126mm spacing. You may be able to switch from 27" rims to the slightly smaller, more common 700c size rims if you can move your brake pads down 4mm.

Of course you'll need new tires if you change rim size. There are a lot more 700c tires to choose from. 27 inch tires are harder to find.

I'd suggest 700c rims if your brakes are compatible and you're planning on replacing the tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You should use a rear hub with 126mm spacing. You may be able to switch from 27" rims to the slightly smaller, more common 700c size rims if you can move your brake pads down 4mm.

Of course you'll need new tires if you change rim size. There are a lot more 700c tires to choose from. 27 inch tires are harder to find.

I'd suggest 700c rims if your brakes are compatible and you're planning on replacing the tires.
Okay--the frame reads, "Carbolite 103." Is it worth putting any work into this thing? I found a website, www.bikemanforu.com, with inexpensive wheel sets, but I don't know what will support my weight... recommend anything for me? Also, I'm fuzzy on freewheel vs cassette... Not sure what I have and what will work on my bike...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
cfd78, sorry that I cannot add too much to your question about wheels, but I can say welcome to Two Spoke! Also, congrats on your decision to change your lifestyle and live longer!! Biking is a good way to do both!
Hey thanks SixtyPlus! I appreciate your reply... hope to get on the road safely and quickly...
 

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cfd78 said:
I am very interested in riding for physical fitness. Since starting my new lifestyle changes, I have already dropped 10 lbs (from 279-269); I plan on continued success. I need to purchase a wheel set to accommodate my weight without breaking the bank. My buddy gave me an old Peugeot road bicycle (pro gratis) to fix up and get riding. Needing new wheels, cassette, and handle bar grips--I figured this would be simple enough, but I think I may be in for an expensive adventure. I welcome any and all suggestions on how to help get me and my body out on the road.

Thanks.
Neuvation wheels, bulletproof and are an incredible value for what you get. Awesome
customer service as well.
 

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I was wrong about needing a 126mm hub. With your steel frame, it's possible to just pull the dropouts wider and push a 130mm hub in, with very little risk of damaging the frame. This will allow the use of a freehub/cassette. One advantage of freehub vs. freewheel is much less likely to bust the rear axle because it supports the weight over a wider space. (Bearings outside of the clicky part rather than inside).

Also wider choice of wheels, cogsets etc.with a 130mm freehub vs. 126mm freewheel.

Better to cold set the frame. See spreading the frame at this link,
http://sheldonbrown.com/frame-spacing.html

Also see forkend alignment here,
http://sheldonbrown.com/forkend-alignment.html
 

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How much do you want to spend?

You don't need to spread your stays if you don't want to. And I've riddin and raced on many freehubs and never ever broke one or saw one break in roughly 40 years of riding!! The only freehubs that did have some minor issues were the 8 speed ones, the 5, 6, and 7's were fine, and the 8's only broke due to either rider weight or a very strong rider, but even then it was rare.

Probably the best place that can build you a more then adequate wheelset is Peter White. Peter White is a bit odd, but if you do as he says and not what you want you will get a wheel set that will never have any issues...he guarantees it too. See; http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/ Most LBS's don't have a clue how to build a wheel to handle a heavy person, and most will just throw a wheel at you and say "this will work" and more often then not it doesn't work for long. For what you get with a Peter White built wheel the cost is not all that much.
 

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I' wouldn't buy a custom wheelset for a 1970s Peugeot, but it appears mine is the minority opinion in this regard.

cfd78, I wouldn't buy wheels with steel rim or 126mm freewheel compatible rear hub either, like some of those available on the site you've linked to. Wheels with alloy rims and freehub would be my choice.
 

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How much do you want to spend?

You don't need to spread your stays if you don't want to. And I've riddin and raced on many freehubs and never ever broke one or saw one break in roughly 40 years of riding...

Freehubs were not available 40 years ago.
 

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Funny about the breaking freewheel thing, there didn't seem to be any problems with them breaking in pro races including the TDF.
 

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Haha, yes that is quite humorous!

When I finally replaced the axle with Campy, the frame broke. I think it was a frame alignment problem, but I'm not the only person who has broken an axle...

I guess the cfd78 could build up a wheelset with vintage Super Record hubs like the ones they used in the TDF when his bike was new, but again I question investing in professional quality components, vintage or modern, for a Peugeot UO-8.

A major selling point for freehubs was the increased strength. Hey if you want to run threaded freewheels, go ahead, but I think the OP would be better served with a freehub/cassette combo.

Availability of freewheels is very limited. Have you tried to find a freewheel with a small cog of less than thirteen teeth?
 

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Freewheels are not very limited, this is the normal comment I hear all the time for vintage stuff. First of E-Bay is just cluttered with freewheels and a lot of them are vintage brands unused. Second of all, Sunrace, Shimano, and Sram make them brand spanking new to this very day...imagine that! Just go to Amazon and type in bike cassettes & freewheels and almost 3 pages of freewheels magically appear.
 

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My advice is freehub/cassette. Cheap stuff will break. They never raced TDF on ebay freewheels.
Then never raced on 80's era freewheels made by Campy, Shimano, Suntour and probably a couple of others that were bought new by the team? Those are the same freewheels you can find on e-bay today with quite a few NOS and NIB, just like you would bought them out of the store. The only thing about that is that back in the 80's they didn't ride on freewheels bought off e-bay because e-bay wasn't around yet!

Cheap stuff will break? Yet most of you ride around on bikes made in China!!!
 
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