Wheelset

Discussion in 'Road Bikes' started by 550eugene, Dec 12, 2013.

  1. 550eugene

    550eugene New Member

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    Little about myself. I'm 5'11" and weight 225 (still on my weight loss journey).

    I'm going to be buying a new carbon bike after Christmas (2013 Felt F5)

    What would be a good set of everyday wheels? I'm not looking to spend a fortune, just something much better than what I will get.
     
  2. rynoman03

    rynoman03 Well-Known Member Tavern Member

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    What is your idea of not spending a fortune? You can get Chinese Carbon wheels for around $440.00 out the door from China.

    http://www.flyxii.com/products.asp?menuid=362

    I have a friend whom has 2 sets of MTB 29" wheelset.

    My new to me road\cx bike has Mavic Ksyrium's.
     

  3. rola643

    rola643 Two skinny Js Staff Member Admin Staff Mod Team Tavern Member

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    First, what is your goal or reason for wanting new wheels? Better, plush ride? Aero, lite, better hubs? What's wrong with the Mavics Felt has listed as coming with the bike for everyday use? At a minimum why not ride them for the winter and look around for new wheels.
     
  4. 550eugene

    550eugene New Member

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    I want something lighter that will pick up speed quicker and hold it better. When I test rode the bike it felt sluggish off the line.

    I don't need winter wheels since I live in Florida. The high for today is 80. Lol
     
  5. John_V

    John_V Moderator Staff Member Mod Team Tavern Member

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    The Mavic CXP-22 is not a wheelset, per say, but a rim put together as a wheelset by the manufacturer on various makes of hubs and spoke combinations. The Mavic rims are excellent rims and are very lightweight. I had them on my Defy with Sipam racing spokes. The issue I had with the wheel was the Formula hubs. When I got my Colnago, the wheels from my Defy were actually much lighter in weight than the Shimano 501 wheelset that's on the Colnago, but the 501 hubs were way better than the Formula hubs. I didn't want to spend the extra money to have the Mavic rim put on the 501 hubs, so I just kept the 501 wheelset.

    So, here is a suggestion. Ride the bike for a while. A short test ride isn't really going to tell you how the bike handles in most situations, unless you rode it for several hours and over various types of road conditions. If you still don't like the way the wheels feel, try getting new hubs. It is often cheaper to get better hubs and spokes than it would be to change out the entire wheelset, even if you have to pay to have the wheels laced and trued.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2013
  6. DaFlake

    DaFlake Well-Known Member Tavern Member

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    Yet another to suggest that you ride it a little first. That wheel set is really not that bad and will break in a little as you ride it.

    However, I am confused. You say the bike is sluggish off the line? My concern is that what you are feeling is not the wheels but rather the frame twisting under load. You are still a large person (as am I at 6'1"/205) and we we to put a lot of pressure on these frames. I would hate to see you toss money after something that won't resolve the problem. Have you ridden other brands at that level?
     
  7. rola643

    rola643 Two skinny Js Staff Member Admin Staff Mod Team Tavern Member

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    I'm not sure a wheel set is gonna get you what you want. Personally I would look to better hubs to "hold" speed better as far as wheels are concerned.

    As mentioned, I would be careful with lighter wheels which means lower spoke counts.

    Im not a lite guy in cycling terms at 6' and 175 and now wee bit more due to injury and tons of inactivity and to much good beer :eek:. I went from Mavic Ksyriums with 18/20 spoke count to HED Belguim C2 with Alchamy hubs and it's a WAY bettere setup. I can't remember the spoke count but it's much more than Mavics were as well as much wider. Very plush smooth, pretty easy to spin up quickly. As soon as i wear the Conti 4000s on them out ( unfortunately the tires are brand new ) I'll be moving to 700X25....maybe tubeless at the same time.
     
  8. 550eugene

    550eugene New Member

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    The F5 is the stiffest bike I've rode yet out of ten or so bikes I've tested. The wheelset weights about 2050g. All the reviews I've read online suggest replacing the current wheels with lighter wheels. This is why I was asking.

    The AR 4 has Felt aero wheels am which are about 300g lighter and I felt handled acceleration much better than the Mavic.

    That's a great idea about switching out hubs and spokes.
     
  9. John_V

    John_V Moderator Staff Member Mod Team Tavern Member

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    If you decide to change the hubs rather than buy a new wheelset, make sure that the LBS has someone there that knows how to lace and true a wheel properly. Some shops do not have people that can do that and would much rather push a wheelset off on you since it's easier for them. One of the guys I ride with from time-to-time took his wheel in to have a broken spoke replaced and his wheel trued. It was not pretty. While the wheel looked OK, it was not tightened properly and he popped two more spokes on his second ride.
     
  10. kneedrachen

    kneedrachen Moderator Mod Team Tavern Member

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    At 225lbs, 300g on your wheels is not going to turbocharge your ride. Not to be a ****** here, but get some good miles in, lose the weight and THEN upgrade the wheels.

    Why?

    The less you weigh, the lighter/more fragile a wheel you can run with lower count, smaller gauge spokes without risk of turning the wheel into a taco. Does it make sense to weigh 225lbs and save 300g on your wheels or does it make more sense to weight 180lbs and save 650-700g on your wheels?

    If the bike is "sluggish off the line", I think it's more the engine than the wheels that'll make a difference.

    Again, I'm sure this is coming off harsh and I don't mean it to, but I think there may be a better way to get the speed/acceleration you're looking for without taking stopgap measures.
     
  11. elviejo

    elviejo Retired

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    What knee said!! ;)
     
  12. 550eugene

    550eugene New Member

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    I totally understand. You make a great point. I lost 70 pounds this year and the weight loss has made a huge difference on speed.

    I'll put a year on the wheelset and save for a set.
     
  13. Merlincustom

    Merlincustom Senior Member

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    All due respect to you and the OP, but I don't think either of you are twisting any carbon frames.
     
  14. DaFlake

    DaFlake Well-Known Member Tavern Member

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    Okay, twisting may have been too strong of a word, but there is flex that happens which will cause a loss of power to the wheels. It is just simple physics.
     
  15. zero3one

    zero3one Member

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    Lets be honest here... and not to sound harsh but I don't thing most of us are in any league to be concerned about any actual loss of power due to frame flex. Unless you are racing pro it won't really matter in the long run nor should it matter for your enjoyment.

    Just get out there, ride and enjoy!

    I myself ride a Roubaix, I'm sure if you crunch the numbers it has more flex than a Tarmac but you know what, unless I'm racing I don't care about finishing 1 or 2 seconds faster on a different bike. I just love riding.

    Now, as for a wheelset, I personally love my Mavic Krysrium. They are most definitely lighter and faster than the sock Mavic CXP22 but the best upgrade I made was dropping 20 pounds. I commend you on your journey of weight loss! Keep riding, having fun, the rest will fall into place!
     
  16. DaFlake

    DaFlake Well-Known Member Tavern Member

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    Spot on! :thumbsup:
     
  17. omnivox42

    omnivox42 New Member Tavern Member

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    Check out Rol Wheels Du'Huez 24/28 spoke build for a lighter wheel. I have this set and they are amazing. The race SL will be more "areo" and provide a little more material for strength.
     
  18. rola643

    rola643 Two skinny Js Staff Member Admin Staff Mod Team Tavern Member

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  19. froze

    froze Banned

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    Do not buy cheap Chinese made wheels if you value your arse! Quality control on generic Chinese wheels is spotty and they play the shell game...what's that you scream? they hit the market with Zing Louie's wheels on E-Bay or some such thing, then when recalls and problems start flooding back they close the business and restart instantly under another name like Zou Fooey; and Chinese companies are not under any consumer protection laws like other companies and are not subject to any consumer lawsuit.

    I agree with the weight issue mentioned by Kneedrachen too, you need to work on getting in better shape and getting your weight down before you consider getting lighter wheels. Those lighter wheels won't last long under that weight and the the constant banging of surface streets. When your weight gets below 210 pounds and hopefully closer to below 200 then if you want better wheels then do it, but you always have to keep in mind that better wheels won't suddenly give you 5 mph more average speed, you'll be lucky to see 1/2 a mile per hour more! And if you're riding on streets you should consider durability over less weight.

    Let me put this into more perspective for you. Since 1963 till 2013 the Tour de France has only seen the average speed increase by 3 km per hour, that's 1.86 miles per hour! And if that isn't bad enough, the real shocker is that the TDF has shrunk some 400 miles over that same time period, so in reality as the years have gone by the TDF has gotten slower!!

    So don't expect dropping $2K on wheels, or 15K on a bike is going to suddenly shoot you up 5 mph because you won't come close.
     
  20. omnivox42

    omnivox42 New Member Tavern Member

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    Froze, well put in regards to the TDF. I was just reading in one of the bike rags that the TDF has become shorter over time. Especially the mountain stages.